Welcome to Muirs Bookshop & Café

We are a large Independent bookshop in the Main Street of Gisborne offering a wide range of best-selling and eclectic, literary fiction, non-fiction and carefully selected children’s books.  We also have an increasing second hand book selection in our Cemetary of Forgotten Books.

We have one of the most comprehensive collections of Maori books in print and most Maori children’s books too.

All Gisborne books, still in print, are on our shelves as well as a great range in the  New Zealand reference section.

We offer the full shopping experience, tremendous selection, great reading atmosphere, gift-wrapping and a beautiful range of cards and can even put things in the post for you.  The staff are all readers and only too willing to impart their knowledge and choices should you ask.

Our café offers delicious coffee, sun-soaked outdoor balcony overlooking Gladstone Road Gisborne, delicious cakes and slices and a lovely range of salads and savoury treats.

And we have Wi-fi, thanks to the local Gizzy-Fi wireless facility.

Good reads from our collection.......

The Antipodeans by Greg McGeeAntipodeans

RRP $38

A novel of epic proportions, in which families from opposite ends of the earth discover an intergenerational legacy of love, blood and betrayal. The Antipodeans spans three generations of New Zealand and Italian families, from Venice to the South Island of New Zealand, from the assassination of a Gestapo commander in the last days of Italian resistance during World War II, to contemporary real estate shenanigans in Auckland, and from political assassination in the darkest days of the Red Brigades to the vaulting cosmology of particle physics.

Greg McGee writes for theatre, film and television and has won the Ngaio Marsh Award for best crime fiction. He was the recipient of the Katherine Mansfield Menton Fellowship in 2013.

Face to Face by Paul Moon (text) and Jane Ussher (photography)Face to face

RRP $50

Stimulating, humorous, sometimes controversial and always revealing, Face to Face offers intimate portraits of the lives of twelve remarkable New Zealanders. Through conversations with Paul Moon, one of the country's most acclaimed historians and cultural commentators, and through the lens of award-winning photographer Jane Ussher, we get to know these extraordinary Kiwis like never before. Face to Face is a rare survey of the diversity of talent that contributes to the character of our country. Sir Richard Hadlee Patricia Grace Sir Robert Jones Hone Harawira Fiona Pardington Sir Peter Gluckman Michael Houstoun Sir Miles Warren Dame Alison Holst Sir Lloyd Geering Tim Finn Mai Chen

The Fire Economy: New Zealand's Reckoning: 2015 by Jane KelseyFire Economy

RRP $50

The FIRE economy - finance, insurance and real estate - is now the world's principal source of wealth creation. Its rise has transformed our political, economic and social landscapes. From rising inequality and ballooning household debt to a global financial crisis and fiscal austerity, instability has accompanied this new orthodoxy. Yet it has proven remarkably resilient, even resurgent, in New Zealand and abroad.Examining the FIRE economy takes Jane Kelsey back to her bestselling account of the neoliberal revolution, The New Zealand Experiment. The systematic transfer of power first detailed in that groundbreaking work is shown to have advanced, embedding neoliberalism in New Zealand. The FIRE economy is sustained by the norms, rules and institutions of this new orthodoxy - a complex web of global finance, light regulation, debt, risk tolerance and property bubbles.The continuing narrative of neoliberalism in New Zealand reveals financial crises to be inherent to the very structure of the FIRE economy. How we respond to New Zealand's future crises, however, means questioning what responses the failing neoliberal orthodoxy will actually permit.In detailing the barriers the FIRE economy presents to change in New Zealand, Kelsey points towards socially progressive, post-neoliberal futures.

Jane Kelsey is one of New Zealand's most acute social commentators. Professor of Law at the University of Auckland, she is actively committed to social justice in her teaching, her work on Maori sovereignty, and her international research and advocacy on the crisis in globalisation. For several decades her work has centred on the interface between globalisation and domestic neoliberalism, with particular reference to free trade and investment agreements.

Historic Churches: A Guide to Over 60 Early New Zealand Churches by Linda BurgessHistoric Churches

RRP $50

An affectionate, entertaining and informative guide to New Zealand's early churches, from quaint country churches and small school chapels, to grand cathedrals and curious synagogues. Following on from the success of Historic Houses, writer Linda and photographer Robert Burgess travel the length and breadth of New Zealand visiting over 60 historic, unique, quirky, architecturally significant, weather-beaten, downtown, and back-of-beyond churches. Along the way they encounter the architects, ministers, missionaries and personalities with a story to tell. They also discover the tragic links, battles fought, injustices and even murders the churches bore witness to over the decades. Historic Churches features handsome photographs of the churches featured, inside and out, accompanying an engaging text that will take you on a rich and colourful journey.

A Little Life by Hanya YanagiharaA Little Life

RRP $38

Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2015 A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara is an immensely powerful and heartbreaking novel of brotherly love and the limits of human endurance. When four graduates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their centre of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he'll not only be unable to overcome - but that will define his life forever.

The Girl in the Spider's Web: Continuing Stieg Larsson's Millennium Series by David LagercrantzGirl in Spiders Web

RRP $38

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO IS BACK. Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist have not been in touch for some time. Then Blomkvist is contacted by renowned Swedish scientist Professor Balder. Warned that his life is in danger, but more concerned for his son's well-being, Balder wants Millennium to publish his story - and it is a terrifying one. More interesting to Blomkvist than Balder's world-leading advances in Artificial Intelligence, is his connection with a certain female superhacker. It seems that Salander, like Balder, is a target of ruthless cyber gangsters - and a violent criminal conspiracy that will very soon bring terror to the snowbound streets of Stockholm, to the Millennium team, and to Blomkvist and Salander themselves.

Flood of Fire by Amitar GhoshFlood fire

RRP $38

The thrilling climax to the Ibis trilogy that began with the phenomenal Booker-shortlisted Sea of Poppies. It is 1839 and tension has been rapidly mounting between China and British India following the crackdown on opium smuggling by Beijing. With no resolution in sight, the colonial government declares war. One of the vessels requisitioned for the attack, the Hind, travels eastwards from Bengal to China, sailing into the midst of the First Opium War. The turbulent voyage brings together a diverse group of travellers, each with their own agenda to pursue. Among them is Kesri Singh, a sepoy in the East India Company who leads a company of Indian sepoys; Zachary Reid, an impoverished young sailor searching for his lost love, and Shireen Modi, a determined widow en route to China to reclaim her opium-trader husband's wealth and reputation. Flood of Fire follows a varied cast of characters from India to China, through the outbreak of the First Opium War and China's devastating defeat, to Britain's seizure of Hong Kong. Flood of Fire is a richly populated novel, imbued with a wealth of historical detail, suffused with the magic of place and plotted with verve. It is a beautiful novel in its own right, and a compelling conclusion to an epic and sweeping story.

The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev SahotaYear of the runaways

RRP $35

The Year of the Runaways tells of the bold dreams and daily struggles of an unlikely family thrown together by circumstance. Thirteen young men live in a house in Sheffield, each in flight from India and in desperate search of a new life. Tarlochan, a former rickshaw driver, will say nothing about his past in Bihar; and Avtar has a secret that binds him to protect the choatic Randeep. Randeep, in turn, has a visa-wife in a flat on the other side of town: a clever, devout woman whose cupboards are full of her husband's clothes, in case the immigration men surprise her with a call. Sweeping between India and England, and between childhood and the present day, this generous, unforgettable novel is - as with Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance - a story of dignity in the face of adversity and the ultimate triumph of the human spirit.

Noonday by Pat BarkerNoonday

RRP $37

Paul Tarrant, Elinor Brooke and Kit Neville first met in 1914 at the Slade School of Art, before their generation lost hope, faith and much else besides on the battlefields of Ypres and the Somme. Now it is 1940, they are middle-aged, and another war has begun. London is a haunted city. Some have even turned to seances in an attempt to contact lost loved ones. As the bombs fall and Elinor and the others struggle to survive, old temptations and obsessions return, and all of them are forced to make choices about what they really want...

Completing the story begun with LIfe Class and continued with Toby's Room, Noonday is both a stand-alone novel and the climax of the trilogy. Wroiting about the Second World War for the first time, Pat Barker brings the besieged and haunted city of London into electrifying life in her most powerful novel since the Regeneration Trilogy.

Penguin and the Lane Brothers: the Untold Story of a Publishing Revolution by Stuart KellsPenguin

RRP $48

An intimate partnership of three brothers - Allen, Richard and John Lane - lay at the heart of Penguin Books, the twentieth century's greatest publishing house. In a spirit of daring and creative opposition, the brothers issued quality book on a massive scale and at minuscule prices - and achieved a revolution in publishing. The Lane boys did their best thinking together in bathroom board meetings, where at least one director would always be 'mother naked'. They innovated in countless ways - in the early years, a church crypt served as their office and warehouse. Penguin was an unconventional upstart, bringing literary giants such as Agatha Christie, George Bernard Shaw, Virginia Woolf and Graham Greene to vast new audiences, and it seemed unstoppable. Yet the 1942 death of John Lane brought the troika to a halt. Allen, the enthusiastic frontman who relied on his younger brothers to drive Penguin's success, became more erratic and suspicious over time. Ultimately, he would force Richard out of the company he had con-founded and built. A portrait of a remarkable family and a publishing powerhouse, Penguin and the Lane Brothers also explores the little known story of Richard Lane - the heart and backbone of Penguin, and its strongest influence. Richards's experience as a youth in Australia shaped his character and outlook; his dedication to the business was matched only by his devotion to his brothers. Relying on unprecedented access to Lane family sources, including Richard's diaries, Penguin and the Lane Brothers sheds new light on the relationship of Allen, Richard and John, so crucial as a driver of Penguin's spirit and success. By turns hilarious and tragic, moving and insightful, this is a groundbreaking counter-history of an unlikely publishing triumph.

Terrain: Travels Through a Deep Landscape by Geoff ChappleTerrain

RRP $40

New Zealand's many distinctive landforms are packed into a small space. Geoff Chapple, author of Te Araroa: The New Zealand Trail, set out on a year-long journey to find out why, and to seek out the shifting forces that shape them. For company, he chose to walk with geologists and the artisans who work the rock. The journey took him back through geology's global history and onward from end to end of New Zealand. Terrain is the result - a lucid, personal and sometimes funny account of New Zealand's most astonishing landscapes. Their stories and revelations are a prompt to look more closely at the ground we walk on.

Geoff Chapple founded Te Araroa, the New Zealand-long walking track that opened in 2011. He is an author, journalist, playwright, occasional musician, and was once the librettist for an opera. He has won prizes for his movie scriptwriting, and his journalism. Chapple's six books include a biography of Rewi Alley, the New Zealander who founded peasant schools in China and took part in China's 1949 revolution. He also wrote, from a protest viewpoint, a people's account of the divisive 1981 Springbok tour of New Zealand. In 2003 he won the Environment category of the Montana New Zealand Book Awards with his book Te Araroa: The New Zealand Trail.

The Party Line by Sue OrrSue Orr

RRP $38

The Baxters do not know their place. On the first of June every year sharemilkers load their trucks with their families, pets and possessions and crawl along the highways towards new farms, new lives. They're inching towards that ultimate dream -- buying their own land. Fenward's always been lucky with its sharemilkers; grateful, grafting folk who understand what's expected of them. Until now, when grief-stricken Ian Baxter and his precocious daughter Gabrielle arrive. Nickie Walker is enchanted by the glamour and worldliness of Gabrielle. Nickie's mother, however, finds herself in the crossfire of a moral battle too terrifying to confront. Each has a story to share. This is a coming-of-age story for two young girls who hold a mirror up to the place and people they love. It's a coming-of-age story, too, for a community forced to stare back at the image of a toxic soul. The question is: who will blink first?

A tale of individual bravery versus silent, collective complicity, set in a vividly drawn farming community in 1970's New Zealand.

Man on Fire by Stephen KelmanMan on Fire

RRP $33

John Lock has come to India to meet his destiny: a destiny dressed in a white karate suit and sporting an impressive moustache. He has fled the quiet desperation of his life in England: decades wasted in a meaningless job, a marriage foundering in the wake of loss and a terrible secret he cannot bear to share with his wife. He has come to offer his help to a man who has learned to conquer pain, a world record breaker who specialises in feats of extreme endurance and ill-advised masochism. Bibhuti Nayak's next record attempt - to have fifty baseball bats broken over his body - will set the seal on a career that has seen him rise from poverty to become a minor celebrity in a nation where standing out from the crowd requires tenacity, courage and perhaps a touch of madness. In answering Bibhuti's call for assistance, John hopes to rewrite a brave end to a life poorly lived. But as they take their leap of faith together, and John is welcomed into Bibhuti's family, and into the colour and chaos of Mumbai - where he encounters ping-pong-playing monks, a fearless seven-year-old martial arts warrior and an old man longing for the monsoon to wash him away - he learns more about life, and death, and everything in between than he could ever have bargained for.

Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads by Paul TherouxDeep South

RRP $40

For the past fifty years, Paul Theroux has travelled to the far corners of the earth - to China, India, Africa, the Pacific Islands, South America, Russia, and elsewhere - and brought them to life in his cool, exacting prose. In Deep South he turns his gaze to a region much closer to his home. Travelling through North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas he writes of the stunning landscapes he discovers - the deserts, the mountains, the Mississippi - and above all, the lives of the people he meets. He talks to mayors and social workers, writers and reverends, the working poor and farming families: the unsung heroes of the South, people who, despite it all, never left, and also those who returned home to rebuild a place they could never live without.

His ability to sum up a people or a city in a few lines is undiminished - Daily Telegraph Theroux's work remains the standard by which other travel writing must be judged - Observer The world's most perceptive travel writer - Daily Mail

Barbarian Days by William FinneganA surfing life

RRP $33

Surfing only looks like a sport. To devotees, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a mental and physical study, a passionate way of life. William Finnegan first started surfing as a young boy in California and Hawaii. Barbarian Days is his immersive memoir of a life spent travelling the world chasing waves through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa, Peru and beyond. Finnegan describes the edgy yet enduring brotherhood forged among the swell of the surf; and recalling his own apprenticeship to the world's most famous and challenging waves, he considers the intense relationship formed between man, board and water. Barbarian Days is an old-school adventure story, a social history, an extraordinary exploration of one man's gradual mastering of an exacting and little-understood art. It is a memoir of dangerous obsession and enchantment.

There are too many breathtaking, original things in Barbarian Days to do more than mention here - observations about surfing that have simply never been made before, or certainly never so well. But a particularly remarkable feature of Barbarian Days is the generous yet unsparing portraits of competitive surf friendships that make up a major share of the narrative. New York Times

Early One Morning by Virginia BailyEarly one morning

RRP $38

A grey dawn in 1943: on a street in Rome, two young women, complete strangers to each other, lock eyes for a single moment. One of the women, Chiara Ravello, is about to flee the occupied city for the safety of her grandparents' house in the hills. The other has been herded on to a truck with her husband and their young children, and will shortly be driven off into the darkness. In that endless-seeming moment, before she has time to think about what she is doing, Chiara makes a decision that changes her life for ever. Loudly claiming the woman's son as her own nephew, she demands his immediate return; only as the trucks depart does she begin to realize what she has done. She is twenty-seven, single, with a sister who needs her constant care, a hazardous journey ahead of her, and now a child in her charge - a child with no papers who refuses to speak and gives every indication that he will bolt at the first opportunity. Threedecades later, Chiara lives alone in Rome, a self-contained, self-possessed woman working as a translator and to all appearances quite content with a life which revolves around work, friends, music and the theatre. But always in the background is the shadow of Daniele, the boy from the truck, whose absence haunts her every moment. Gradually we learn of the havoc wrought on Chiara, her family and her friends by the boy she rescued, and how he eventually broke her heart. And when she receives a phone call from a teenage girl named Maria, claiming to be Daniele's daughter, Chiara knows that it is time for her to face up to the past. This epic novel is an unforgettably powerful, suspenseful, heartbreaking and inspiring tale of love, loss and war's reverberations down the years.

The Blue Between Sky and Water by Susan AbulhawaBlue between sky

RRP $37

It is 1947, and Beit Daras, a quiet village in Palestine surrounded by olive groves, is home to the Baraka family. Eldest daughter Nazmiyeh looks after her widowed mother, prone to wandering and strange outbursts, while her brother Mamdouh tends to the village bees. Their younger sister, Mariam, with her striking mismatched eyes, spends her days talking to imaginary friends and writing. When Israeli forces gather outside the town's borders, nobody suspects the terror that is about to descend. Soon the village is burning and, amidst smoke and ash, the family must take the long road to Gaza, in a walk that will test them to their limits. Sixty years later, Mamdouh's granddaughter Nur is living in America. She falls in love with a married man, a doctor who works in Palestine, and follows him to Gaza. There she meets Alwan, the mother of Khaled - a boy trapped in his own body, unable to wake up from a deep blue dream. It is through her that Nur will at last discover the ties of kinship that transcend distance - and even death. The Blue Between Sky and Water is a story of powerful, flawed women; of relocation, separation and heartache; of renewal, family, endurance, and love. Susan Abulhawa brings a raw humanity and delicate authority to the story of Palestine in this devastatingly beautiful tale.

The Crossing by Andrew MillerThe Crossing

RRP $38

She is sailing. She is alone. Ahead of her is the world's curve and beyond that, everything else. The known, the imagined, the imagined known. Who else has entered Tim's life the way Maud did? This girl who fell past him, lay seemingly dead on the ground, then stood and walked. That was where it all began. He wants her - wants to rescue her, to reach her. Yet there is nothing to suggest Maud has any need of him, that she is not already complete. A woman with a talent for survival, who works long hours and loves to sail - preferably on her own. A woman who, when a crisis comes, will turn to the sea for refuge, embarking on a voyage that will test her to the utmost, that will change everything ...From the Costa Award-winning author of Pure comes a viscerally honest, hypnotic portrait of modern love and motherhood, the lure of the sea and the ultimate unknowability of others. This pitch-perfect novel confirms Andrew Miller's position as one of the finest writers of his generation.

'His writing is vivid, precise and constantly surprising ... It reads easily, suspends life until it is read and is a source of wonder and delight' Sunday Times A writer of very rare and outstanding gifts Independent on Sunday His startling sentences, both beautiful and distressing, can lodge themselves in your brain Daily Telegraph An exquisite gift for poetic description ... the writing is dazzlingly fresh and modern The Times He writes like a poet, with a deceptive simplicity - his sentences and images are intense distillations, conjuring the fleeting details of existence with clarity Guardian

Fracture: Life and Culture in the West, 1918-1938 by Philipp BlomFracture

RRP $33

When the Great War ended in 1918, the West was broken. Religious faith, patriotism, and the belief in human progress had all been called into question by the mass carnage experienced by both sides. Shell shocked and traumatized, the West faced a world it no longer recognized: the old order had collapsed, replaced by an age of machines. The world hurtled forward on gears and crankshafts, and terrifying new ideologies arose from the wreckage of past belief. In Fracture, critically acclaimed historian Philipp Blom argues that in the aftermath of World War I, citizens of the West directed their energies inwards, launching into hedonistic, aesthetic, and xenophobia. America closed its borders to European refugees and turned away from the desperate poverty caintellectual adventures of self-discovery. It was a period of both bitter disillusionment and visionary progress. From Surrealism to Oswald Spengler's The Decline of the West; from Fritz Lang's Metropolis to theoretical physics, and from Art Deco to Jazz and the Charleston dance, artists, scientists, and philosophers grappled with the question of how to live and what to believe in a broken age. Morbid symptoms emerged simultaneously from the decay of World War I: progress and innovation were everywhere met with increasing racism andused by the Great Depression. On both sides of the Atlantic, disenchanted voters flocked to Communism and fascism, forming political parties based on violence and revenge that presaged the horror of a new World War. Vividly recreating this era of unparalleled ambition, artistry, and innovation, Blom captures the seismic shifts that defined the interwar period and continue to shape our world today.

You Don't Have to Live Like This by Benjamin MarkovitsYou Don't

RRP $33

From one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists comes a darkly comic and brutally insightful vision of contemporary America in the wake of the global financial crisis. Ten years out of Yale, with an extra degree from Oxford, and all Greg Marnier has to show for it is a rambling academic career that has landed him in Aberystwyth. At his college reunion, jetlagged and drunk, he runs into an old friend who offers him an extraordinary way out. Robert James, wealthy and influential, a success story of the dotcom bubble, wants to become a political player. His plan: to buy up several abandoned neighbourhoods in Detroit - the poster child for urban decline - and build a new America from their boarded-up ruins. For a small investment, Marnier can transform himself into a twenty-first-century pioneer. The realities of life on America's urban frontier soon become apparent. For every hopeful misfit who's come for a fresh start there's a native Detroiter whose patch is being swallowed up by the new colonials. Marnier finds himself caught in the middle of everyone else's battles - between local and outsider, rich and poor, black and white - until a terrible accident forces him to take sides.

Cabins by Philip JodidioCabins

RRP $130

Life in the woods. Creative cabin architecture. Ever since Henry David Thoreau's described his two years, two months, and two days of cabin existence at Walden Pond, Massachusetts in Walden or, Life in the Woods (1854), the idea of a refuge dwelling has seduced the modern psyche. In the past decade, as our material existence and environmental footprint has grown exponentially, architects around the globe have become particularly interested in the possibilities of the minimal, low-impact, and isolated abode. Combining insightful text, rich photography and bright, contemporary illustrations by Marie-Laurc Cruschi, this TASCHEN title explores how this particular architectural type presents special opportunities for creative thinking. In eschewing excess, the cabin limits actual spatial intrusion to the bare essentials of living requirements, while in responding to its typically rustic setting, it foregrounds eco-friendly solutions. As such, the cabin comes to showcase some of the most inventive and forward-looking practice of contemporary architecture, with Renzo Piano, Terunobu Fujimori, Tom Kundig and many fresh young professionals all embracing such distilled sanctuary spaces. The cabins selected for this publication emphasize the variety of the genre, both in terms of usage and geography. From an artist studio on the Suffolk coast in England to eco-home huts in the Western Ghats region of India, this survey is as exciting in its international reach as it is in its array of briefs, clients, and situations. Constant throughout, however, is architectural innovation, and an inspiring sense of contemplation and coexistence as people return to nature and to a less destructive model of being in the world.

Coming Rain by Stephen DaisleyComing Rain

RRP $37

"They returned to the main part of the shed and it was Lew's turn to sharpen his cutters. The woolshed now bright and well lit. Painter walked to his stand and connected the handpiece to the down-rod. He drizzled oil over the comb and the cutter, adjusted the tension and pulled the rope to engage the running gear. The handpiece buzzed and he studied it for a moment, pulled the rope again to disengage the running gear. Repeated the process with his spare handpiece. Filled the oil can and stepped to the catching-pen door, leaned on it and looked at the sheep in the pen. Lit a cigarette, waiting for Lew." Western Australia, the wheatbelt. Lew McLeod has been travelling and working with Painter Hayes since he was a boy. Shearing, charcoal burning - whatever comes. Painter made him his first pair of shoes. It's a hard and uncertain life but it's the only one he knows. But Lew's a grown man now. And with this latest job, shearing for John Drysdale and his daughter Clara, everything will change. Stephen Daisley writes in lucid, rippling prose of how things work, and why; of the profound satisfaction in hard work done with care, of love and friendship and the damage that both contain.

Seveneves by Neal StephensonSeveneves

RRP $37

The astounding new novel from the master of science fiction. What would happen if the world were ending? When a catastrophic event renders the earth a ticking time bomb, it triggers a feverish race against the inevitable. An ambitious plan is devised to ensure the survival of humanity far beyond our atmosphere. But unforeseen dangers threaten the intrepid pioneers, until only a handful of survivors remain...Five thousand years later, their progeny - seven distinct races now three billion strong - embark on yet another audacious journey into the unknown, to an alien world utterly transformed by cataclysm and time: Earth. A writer of dazzling genius and imaginative vision, Neal Stephenson combines science, philosophy, technology, psychology, and literature in a magnificent work of speculative fiction that offers a portrait of a future that is at once extraordinary and eerily recognizable. He explores some of our biggest ideas and perplexing challenges in a breathtaking saga that is daring, engrossing, and altogether brilliant.

The Wolf Border by Sarah HallWolf Border

RRP $37

For almost a decade Rachel Caine has turned her back on home, kept distant by family disputes and her work monitoring wolves on an Idaho reservation. But now, summoned by the eccentric Earl of Annerdale and his controversial scheme to reintroduce the Grey Wolf to the English countryside, she is back in the peat and wet light of the Lake District. The earl's project harks back to an ancient idyll of untamed British wilderness - though Rachel must contend with modern-day concessions to health and safety, public outrage and political gain - and the return of the Grey after hundreds of years coincides with her own regeneration: impending motherhood, and reconciliation with her estranged family. The Wolf Border investigates the fundamental nature of wilderness and wildness, both animal and human. It seeks to understand the most obsessive aspects of humanity: sex, love, and conflict; the desire to find answers to the question of our existence; those complex systems that govern the most superior creature on earth.

Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits and Spies in the Late Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World by Noel MalcolmAgents                     RRP $75

In the second half of the sixteenth century, most of the Christian states of Western Europe were on the defensive against a Muslim superpower - the Empire of the Ottoman sultans. There was violent conflict, from raiding and corsairing to large-scale warfare, but there were also many forms of peaceful interaction across the surprisingly porous frontiers of these opposing power-blocs. Agents of Empire describes the paths taken through the eastern Mediterranean and its European hinterland by members of a Venetian-Albanian family, almost all of them previously invisible to history. They include an archbishop in the Balkans, the captain of the papal flagship at the Battle of Lepanto, the power behind the throne in the Ottoman province of Moldavia, and a dragoman (interpreter) at the Venetian embassy in Istanbul. Through the life-stories of these adventurous individuals over three generations, Noel Malcolm casts the world between Venice, Rome and the Ottoman Empire in a fresh light, illuminating subjects as diverse as espionage, diplomacy, the grain trade, slave-ransoming and anti-Ottoman rebellion. He describes the conflicting strategies of the Christian powers, and the extraordinarily ambitious plans of the sultans and their viziers. Few works since Fernand Braudel's classic account of thesixteenth-century Mediterranean, published more than sixty years ago, have ranged so widely through this vital period of Mediterranean and European history. A masterpiece of scholarship as well as story-telling, Agents of Empire builds up a panoramic picture, both of Western power-politics and of the interrelations between the Christian and Ottoman worlds.

The End of Plenty: the Race to Feed a Crowded World by Joel K. Bourne JrEnd of plenty

RRP $40

Introducing a new generation of farmers and scientists on the frontlines of the next green revolution. When Malthus famously outlined the brutal relationship between food and population, he never imagined the success of modern agriculture. New seeds, chemicals and irrigation, coupled with free trade, drove the greatest global population boom in history - but left ecological devastation and an unsustainable agro-economic status quo in their wake. Now, with a greater number of mouths to feed than ever before, tightening global food supplies have spurred riots and reform around the world. Joel K. Bourne Jr. takes readers from his family farm to international agricultural hotspots, searching for new solutions that can sustainably feed us all. He visits young corporate farmers trying to restore Ukraine as Europe's breadbasket, a Canadian aquaculturist channelling ancient Chinese traditions, the agronomist behind the world's largest organic sugar-cane plantation, and many other people and groups, large and small, who are racing to stave off a Malthusian catastrophe. Part history, part reportage, part advocacy, The End of Plenty is a wake-up call for anyone concerned with what the coming decades will hold for our planet and its inhabitants if we don't take action.

Sacred Spaces: Contemporary Religious Architecture by James PallisterSacred Spaces

RRP $90

A ground-breaking and enlightening exploration of the structures which elevate architecture to spirituality. Sacred Spaces showcases 30 of the most breath-taking, innovative, iconic and undiscovered examples of contemporary religious architecture, including work by well-known architects alongside emerging designers. Spanning all major religions and places of worship from intimate, reflective chapels and cemeteries to dramatic cathedrals and memorials, Sacred Spaces documents each project with lavish-in-depth photography and drawings and texts by James Pallister that provide a modern historical context. An inspiring collection and thorough survey, the buildings in Sacred Spaces will appeal to architects and designers as well as the general public intrigued by creative culture, religion and spirituality. Includes the 'Cardboard Cathedral' in Christchuch.

"Beautifully photographed, and elegantly elucidated by James Pallister, "Sacred Spaces" is a field report from the cult of Corbusier. . . Pallister has captured their enduring aspirations - and their fleeting perfection." - Washington Post

The Complete Atlas of Human Anatomy and Surgery  by  Jean-Marie Le Minor and Henri SickAtlas of Anatomy

RRP $45

The Atlas of Anatomy of Jean Baptiste Marc Bourgery (1797-1849) was not only a massive event in medical history, but also remains one of the most comprehensive and beautifully illustrated anatomical treatises ever published. Bourgery began work on his magnificent atlas in 1830 in cooperation with illustrator Nicolas Henri Jacob (1782-1871), a student of the French painter Jacques Louis David. The first volumes were published the following year, but completion of the treatise required nearly two decades of dedication; Bourgery lived just long enough to finish his labor of love, but the last of the treatise's eight volumes was not published in its entirety until five years after his death. The four parts of Bourgery's treatise cover descriptive anatomy, surgical anatomy and techniques (exploring in detail nearly all the major operations that were performed during the first half of the 19th century), general anatomy and embryology, and microscopic anatomy. Jacob's spectacular hand-colored, life-size lithographs are remarkable for their clarity, color, and aesthetic appeal, reflecting a combination of direct laboratory observation and illustrative research. Unsurpassed to this day, the images offer exceptional anatomical insight, not only for those in the medical field but also for artists, students, and anyone interested in the workings and wonder of the human body.

The Harder They Come by T.C.BoyneHarder they come

RRP $37

Sten Stenson, Vietnam veteran and retired school principal, and his wife, Carolee, are on a cruise in Costa Rica when their coach excursion is hijacked. Sten's military training overtakes him and within moments one of the attackers lies dead. The rest flee and Sten finds himself hailed a hero by the tour group and everyone back home. Meanwhile, in the redwood forests north of San Francisco, Sara - a farrier who refuses to recognize the authority of the government - is arrested after failing to cooperate with police at a routine stop. A chance meeting with twenty-five-year-old Adam, Sten and Carolee's unstable son, sparks a strange but passionate relationship fuelled by a mutual hatred of the law. Adam, an angry and misunderstood outsider, perennially dressed in camouflage and with his head shaved to the bone, has an unhealthy obsession with nineteenth-century mountain man John Colter. As Adam's views and behaviour become steadily more extreme, he descends into a spiral of fanatical violence that is impossible for his family or Sara to halt. The latest novel by internationally bestselling author T. C. Boyle, The Harder They Come is as timely as it is provocative. A deep and disturbing meditation on the roots of American gun violence, it explores the fine line between heroism and savagery, and just how far a parent can be held accountable for the actions of his child.

The Improbability of Love by Hannah RothschildRothschild

RRP $37

Annie McDee, alone after the disintegration of her long-term relationship and trapped in a dead-end job, is searching for a present for her unsuitable lover in a neglected second-hand shop. Within the jumble of junk and tack, a grimy painting catches her eye. Leaving the store with the picture after spending her meagre savings, she prepares an elaborate dinner for two, only to be stood up, the gift gathering dust on her mantelpiece. But every painting has a story - and if it could speak, what would it tell us? For Annie has stumbled across 'The Improbability of Love', a lost masterpiece by Antoine Watteau, one of the most influential French painters of the eighteenth century. Soon Annie is drawn unwillingly into the art world, and finds herself pursued by a host of interested parties that would do anything to possess her picture. For an exiled Russian oligarch, an avaricious Sheika, a desperate auctioneer, an unscrupulous dealer and several others, the painting symbolises their greatest hopes and fears. In her search for the painting's true identity, Annie will uncover the darkest secrets of European history - and in doing so, she will learn more about herself, opening up to the possibility of falling in love again. Irreverent, witty and sharply sweet, The Improbability of Love explores the confusion and turmoil of life and the complexities of love, loss and hurt - revealing the lows to which human nature can stoop and the heights to which the soul can soar.

The Unravelling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq by Emma SkyUnravelling

RRP $50

As a Brit, a woman and a liberal, Emma Sky's presence and position in Iraq following the invasion in 2003 is the stuff of fiction. Shortly after the coalition troops went in, Sky, an Arabist, volunteered to go to assist the Coalition Provisional Authority in the occupation. Alone, she made her way to Baghdad, was told they had enough people, so travelled north, to Kirkuk. Within days she became the most senior civilian there, Kirkuk's lady governor. When the house she was staying in came under mortar fire, Sky realised that she must integrate herself within the US Army in order to survive. She moved into the army compound, and soon won the confidence of top US military officials, among them Gen Odierno, now head of the US Army, who became friend, confidant, mentor. Two years later Sky was back in the UK when she received an email out the blue from Gen Odierno. It was time for the prosecution of the Surge: would she help? Sky became Odierno's key political advisor, and found herself at the very heart of US operations during the perilous and volatile days of the Surge. At the end of 2007 she left once more but almost immediately was recalled for a final tour, when again Odierno sought her help. This time she worked alongside him until 2010, leaving only when US combat operations were ended. A vivid first-hand account of the occupation of Iraq, this is also a deeply personal memoir that explores what it is like to be British, alone and a woman, working both within and outside of the US Army. As Sky writes, 'I have encountered many alien cultures on my travels, but none so alien as the US Army."

Sky has worked at senior levels on behalf of the US and UK governments, in Iraq, Afghanistan and Jerusalem, across the fields of development, defence, and diplomacy, and with multi civilian and military agencies. Sky was made a Member of the British Empire in 2003 and an Officer of the British Empire in 2008 in recognition of her service in Iraq.

The Green Road by Anne EnrightThe green road

RRP $37

A darkly glinting novel set on Ireland's Atlantic coast, The Green Road is a story of fracture and family, selfishness and compassion - a book about the gaps in the human heart and how we learn to fill them. The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she's decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for a last Christmas, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold. Anne Enright is addicted to the truth of things. Sentence by sentence, there are few writers alive who can invest the language with such torque and gleam, such wit and longing - who can write dialogue that speaks itself aloud, who can show us the million splinters of her characters' lives then pull them back up together again, into a perfect glass.

In the Light of What We Know by Zia Haider RahmanIn the Light

RRP $25

One September morning in 2008, an investment banker approaching forty, his career in collapse and his marriage unravelling, receives a surprise visitor at his West London home. He struggles to place the dishevelled figure carrying a backpack, until he recognizes a friend from his student days, a brilliant man who disappeared years earlier under mysterious circumstances. The friend has resurfaced to make a confession of unsettling power. Theirs is the age-old story of the bond between two men and the betrayal of one by the other. As the friends begin to talk, and as their room becomes a world, a journey begins that is by turns exhilarating, shocking, intimate and strange. Set against the breaking of nations and beneath the clouds of economic crisis, and moving between Kabul, New York, Oxford, London and Islamabad, In the Light of What We Know tells the story of people wrestling with unshakeable legacies of class and culture, and pushes at the great questions of love, origins, science, faith and war. In an extraordinary feat of imagination, Zia Haider Rahman has woven the seismic upheavals of our young century into a novel of rare compassion, scope, and courage.

Pre-eminently a novel of ideas, the book overflows with sparkling essays on free will, the perception of time, the nature of memory, maps, flags, etymology and the axioms of mathematics ... A novel about the entwining of politics and love and the painful quest for identity. As a meditation on the penalties of exile, the need for roots and the ways in which anger can consume a thoughtful man slighted by prejudice, this is a dazzling debut. - Sunday Times A splendidly enterprising debut Wall Street Journal A strange and brilliant novel ... I was surprised it didn't explode in my hands -- Amitava Kumar New York Times Book Review

Farewell Kabul: From Afghanistan to a More Dangerous World by Christina Lamb

RRP $35Farewell Kabul

From the award-winning co-author of 'I Am Malala', this book asks just how the might of NATO, with 48 countries and 140,000 troops on the ground, failed to defeat a group of religious students and farmers? How did it go so wrong? Twenty-seven years ago, Christina Lamb left Britain to become a journalist in Pakistan. She crossed the Hindu Kush into Afghanistan with mujaheddin fighting the Russians and fell unequivocally in love with this fierce country of pomegranates and war, a relationship which has dominated her adult life. Since 2001, Lamb has watched with incredulity as the West fought a war with its hands tied, committed too little too late, failed to understand local dynamics and turned a blind eye as their Taliban enemy was helped by their ally Pakistan. Farewell Kabul tells how success was turned into defeat in the longest war fought by the United States in its history and by Britain since the Hundred YearsWar. It has been a fiasco which has left Afghanistan still one of the poorest nations on earth, the Taliban undefeated, and nuclear armed Pakistan perhaps the most dangerous place on earth. With unparalleled access to all key decision-makers in Afghanistan, Pakistan, London and Washington, from heads of state and generals as well as soldiers on the ground, Farewell Kabul tells how this happened. In Afghanistan, Lamb has travelled far beyond Helmand - from the caves of Tora Bora in the south to the mountainous bad lands of Kunar in the east; from Herat, city of poets and minarets in the west, to the very poorest province of Samangan in the north. She went to Guantanamo, met Taliban in Quetta, visited jihadi camps in Pakistan and saw bin Laden's house just after he was killed. Saddest of all, she met women who had been made role models by the West and had then been shot, raped or forced to flee the country. This deeply personal book not only shows the human cost of political failure but explains how short-sighted encouragement of jihadis to fight the Russians, followed by prosecution of ill-thoughtout wars, has resulted in the spread of terrorism throughout the Islamic world.

The Discreet Hero by Mario Vargas LlosaDiscreet Hero

RRP $37

Set in contemporary Peru, glinting with new prosperity, The Discreet Hero follows two fascinating characters whose lives are destined to intersect: a small businessman in the northern town of Piura, who finds himself the victim of blackmail; and the successful owner of an insurance company in Lima, who cooks up a plan to avenge himself against the two lazy sons who want him dead.

Both men are - each in his own way - discreet rebels: honorable men trying to seize control of their destinies in a social and political climate where lives can seem predetermined. Each is willing to risk everything to live according to his own political ideals and desires. 

A novel about love and betrayal, a younger generation that can no longer tell the difference between reality and desire, and the destructive effects of media fantasies.

The Shore by Sara TaylorThe Shore

RRP $32

Longlisted For The Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction 2015. The Shore. A collection of small islands sticking out from the coast of Virginia into the Atlantic Ocean that has been home to generations of fierce and resilient women. Sanctuary to some but nightmare to others, it's a place they've inhabited, fled, and returned to for hundreds of years. From a brave girl's determination to protect her younger sister as methamphetamine ravages their family, to a lesson in summoning storm clouds to help end a drought, these women struggle against domestic violence, savage wilderness, and the corrosive effects of poverty and addiction to secure a sense of well-being for themselves and for those they love. Their interconnecting stories form a deeply affecting legacy of two island families, illuminating the small miracles and miseries of a community of outsiders, and the bonds of blood and fate that connect them all. Dreamlike and yet impossibly real, profound and playful, The Shore is a richly unique, breathtakingly ambitious and accomplished debut novel by a young writer of astonishing gifts.

"An exuberant talent announces her arrival in this Baileys-nominated collection of interlinked stories touching on murder, misogyny and morality ... To find the connections between stories, you have to follow names, places and even objects through 200 years of timeline ... It's a strange but pleasurable way to read, an experience at once postmodern and childish ...The green, lush landscape, the oyster beds, insects and crabs, are evoked through so many eyes and felt by so many hands that we start to believe in their enduring existence, giving backbone and depth to the green politics of the book ...Taylor, it seems, can do dark realism as well as she can the magic kind - in fact, she seems able to do most things. This debut is a testament to an exuberant talent and an original, fearless sensibility. It's also enormous fun to read." Guardian

Green Kitchen Travels: Vegetarian Food Inspired by Our AdventuresGreen Kitchen Travels

by David Frenkiel & Luise Vindahl    RRP $50

After the enormous international success of their first book The Green Kitchen, authors David and Luise are back with another stunning collection of health conscious and delicious recipes - with inspiration taken from all over the world. The leaders of the current health and vegetarian food trend sweeping the world, David and Luise are the real deal - their blog Green Kitchen Stories is one of the world's most visited health conscious and vegetarian blogs (in a saturated market) and won Best Food Blog Special Diet in the 2013 Saveur Blog Awards. They have over 60,000 Facebook fans and almost 50,000 Instagram followers - their reach on social media is huge! Take inspiration from their travels and start the day with indulgent almond pumpkin waffles from San Francisco, tuck into a Raw beansprout pad thai from Thailand for lunch, and a Sri Lankan vegetable curry for supper. David and Luise have you spoilt for choice with desserts,featuring cheesecake, raw tiramisu and a sweet roti pancake. Using easy-to-find ingredients and simple instructions, these recipes are sure to be a success. With stunning photography and food styling, as well as personal anecdotes and images from the authors' travels, Green Kitchen Travels shares modern and inspiring vegetarian, vegan and glutenfree recipes.

Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away by Rebecca Newberger GoldsteinPlato at

RRP $40

Imagine that Plato came to life in the twenty-first century and embarked on a multi-city speaking tour. How would he mediate a debate between a Freudian psychoanalyst and a 'tiger mum' on how to raise the perfect child? How would he handle the host of a right-wing news program who denies there can be morality without religion? What would Plato make of Google, and of the idea that knowledge can be crowdsourced rather than reasoned out by experts? Plato at the Googleplex is acclaimed thinker Rebecca Newberger Goldstein's dazzling investigation of these conundra. With a philosopher's depth and erudition and a novelist's imagination and wit, Goldstein probes the deepest issues confronting us by allowing us to eavesdrop on Plato as he takes on the modern world; it is a stunningly original plunge into the drama of philosophy, revealing its hidden role in today's debates on religion, morality, politics and science.

Goldstein received her doctorate in philosophy from Princeton University. Her award-winning books include the novels The Mind-Body Problem, Properties of Light, and 36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction and nonfiction studies of Kurt Godel and Baruch Spinoza. She has received a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, has been designated a Humanist of the Year and a Freethought Heroine, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe by George FriedmanFlashpoints

RRP $37

Europe is ready to explode. Where will the explosion take place and what will the damage be? This major new book from the bestselling author and geopolitical forecaster George Friedman presents a bold and provocative thesis about the likeliest locations for the coming eruptions. George Friedman forecasted coming global trends in The Next 100 Years and The Next Decade. Now, in Flashpoints, he zooms in on Europe and examines the dry tinder of the region: culture. Walking the faultlines that have existed here for centuries, Friedman inspects all the dormant social and political fissures still smouldering just beneath the continent's surface, and identifies those likely to erupt first. The book begins with a fascinating history of the events leading up to the horrific wars that nearly tore apart Western civilisation, and shows how modern efforts to overcome Europe's geopolitical tensions - including the formation of the European Union - have largely failed. Homing in on half a dozen pivotal locations, George Friedman gauges what the future holds, both in terms of conflict and also opportunity. Flashpoints details how events in Europe will affect the rest of the world - from USA to Russia, from China to Latin America - and reveals a new yet familiar political landscape in what is at once a gripping history lesson and a terrifying forecast of the potential devastation ahead.

Stuffocation: Living More with Less by James WallmanStuffocation

RRP $37

We have more stuff than we could ever need, but having everything we thought we wanted isn't making us happier. It's bad for the planet. It's cluttering up our homes. It's making us feel 'suffocated' and stressed - and it might even be killing us.

In this groundbreaking book, trend forecaster James Wallman finds that a number of people are turning their backs on all-you-can-get consumption. Through fascinating characters and brilliantly told stories, Wallman introduces the innovators whose lifestyles provide clues to how we will all be living tomorrow, and he makes some of the world's most counter-intuitive, radical, and world-changing ideas feel inspiring - and possible for us all.

Wallman's solution to our clutter crisis is fundamental. We have to transform what we value. We have to focus less on possessions and invest more on experiences. With intriguing insights on psychology, economics and culture, Stuffocation is a vital manifesto for change. It has inspired those who have read it to be happier and healthier, and to live more, with less.

The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity by Norman DoidgeThe Brain's Way

RRP $45

This book is about the discovery that the human brain has its own unique way of healing. For centuries we believed that the price we paid for our brain's complexity was that, compared to other organs, it was fixed and unregenerative - unable to recover from damage or illness. In this revolutionary new book, Norman Doidge turns this belief on its head. The phenomenon of neuroplasticity - the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience - is the most important development in our understanding of the brain and mind since the beginning of modern science. Here, Doidge shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. When it is understood, it is often possible to radically improve - and even cure - many conditions thought to be irreversible. Doidge introduces us to the doctors, therapists, and patients who are healing the brain without surgery or medication. We meet patients who have alleviated years of chronic pain; children on the autistic spectrum, or with ADD or learning disorders, who have used neuroplastic techniques to complete a normal education and become independent; and sufferers who have seen symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, brain injuries, and cerebral palsy radically diminish; and we learn how to lower our risk of dementia by 60 per cent. Through hopeful, astonishing stories, The Brain's Way of Healing explains how mind, brain, and body, and the energies around us, work together in health and healing.

Vintage Industrial: Living With Design Icons by Misha de Potestad and Patrice PascalVintage Industrial

RRP $80

An exquisitely illustrated celebration of this influential style that is now at the forefront of interior design. Vintage Industrial covers the period from 1900 to 1950, which produced the raw, functional aesthetic that has become a cornerstone of modern design. The advent of the second industrial revolution created the need for a new kind of furniture to satisfy the demands of a rapidly growing workforce. Chairs, tables, lamps, and modular storage were designed from new materials to be mass-produced, stackable, and adjustable to the developing needs of brand-new industries that in turn were manufacturing the products that would define a changing society. These pieces are now highly popular among collectors and interior designers.

This volume celebrates the engineers who shaped the industrial aesthetic as the unsung heroes of modern design and showcases their creations. By discovering ways to work iron and steel into functional forms, luminaries such as Bernard-Albin Gras, George Carwardine, Jean Prouve, and Edouard-Wilfred Buquet sparked a revolution in the way we think about our built environment. Five chapters-on lighting, seating, tables, storage, and curiosities-describe the major innovations and designs from the period and include stunning photography depicting these objects in homes, workshops, factories, and warehouses. Meticulously curated, this elegant book is an informative style guide and source of inspiration for how to live with industrial design.

Marae - Te Tatau Pounamu: A Journey Around New Zealand's Meeting Houses

by Muru, Robin and Sam Walters                                                     RRP $80Marae

Bishop Muru Walters is a very well known Anglican minister. He is also a master carver, poet, broadcaster and former Maori All Black. His son Robin is a photographer and filmmaker who is director at Curious Films. Sam Walters, Robin's wife, is a photographer. Together the Walters spent three years visiting some of this country's major meeting houses as well as many of the more humble ones - houses that serve smaller hapu and iwi - to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house. They are intensively photographed, with detailed shots of their carvings, kowhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event, the images conveying a rich sense of life and activity. From north to south, from the east coast to the west, and from ancient wharenui to bold new designs, this handsome book, with its engaging personal text, captures the huge variety of New Zealand's original architecture. 

Hymns from the Soil: A Vegetarian Saga by Vikas KhannaHymns from the soil

RRP $75

One of Vikas Khanna's favourite places in the world was the garden he and his grandmother planted in their home in Amritsar, India where he grew up surrounded by large family feasts, and seasonal produce fresh from the fields of  Punjab. It was his very own corner of paradise. Vikas still remembers the thrill of rushing home from school to tend to the aromatic basil, mint, tomatoes and lemons. The garden had a profound effect on the boy who would grow up to become a world-renowned Michelin Star chef.

In Hymns from the Soil: A Vegetarian Saga, Vikas Khanna writes about the lessons he's learnt from Mother Nature. How the bountiful gifts of changing seasons inspired him to cook; how it taught him to combine flavours and design recipes. Vegetarianism has always been integral to Indian culture and it has become the preferred way of life the world over. In this book, vegetables are the star ingredients. The recipes showcase their natural goodness and hidden complexities. They burst with flavour and colour and retain all their nutritious value. Their flexiblity allows you to substitute the ingredients quite easily as Vikas brings together traditional time-tested recipes, handed down over generations, and conjures up exciting new ones.

Vikas Khanna is an award winning Michelin Star Indian chef, restaurateur, food writer, filmmaker, humanitarian and the host of MasterChef India, Junior MasterChef India and Twist of Taste on FOX Traveller. He has received the prestigious Michelin Star for his restaurant Junoon in New York for three consecutive years now.

The Bone Clocks by David MitchellTHe Bone Clocks

RRP $38

The dazzling new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas, at once the kaleidoscopic story of an unusual woman's life, a metaphysical thriller and a profound meditation on mortality and survival.

One drowsy summer's day in 1984, teenage runaway Holly Sykes encounters a strange woman who offers a small kindness in exchange for 'asylum'. Decades will pass before Holly understands exactly what sort of asylum the woman was seeking ...The Bone Clocks follows the twists and turns of Holly's life from a scarred adolescence in Gravesend to old age on Ireland's Atlantic coast as Europe's oil supply dries up - a life not so far out of the ordinary, yet punctuated by flashes of precognition, visits from people who emerge from thin air and brief lapses in the laws of reality. For Holly Sykes - daughter, sister, mother, guardian - is also an unwitting player in a murderous feud played out in the shadows and margins of our world, and may prove to be its decisive weapon.  Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best. Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2014.

Something truly fantastical: an epic in many voices featuring supernatural beings, rips in reality and a global battle between good and evil. Yet Mitchell's superlative prose makes this much more than a tall tale: the novel also takes in family love and loss, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and a horribly plausible near-future in which the end of oil is catapulting the world towards barbarism ... It's a globe-trotting, mind-bending, hair-raising triumph, already sitting pretty on the Booker longlist.- Guardian

Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary HoneyManuka

RRP $35

Not so long ago, in a small island nation in the South Pacific, beekeepers produced a most peculiar honey. It was much darker than the clover honey everyone put on their toast in the morning, and it tasted very different. In fact, the honey was a problem: it was hard to get out of the combs, and even harder for beekeepers to sell. Today that honey, manuka from New Zealand, is known around the world. It fetches high prices, and beekeepers do everything in their power to produce as much of it as possible. Wound dressings containing manuka honey are used in leading hospitals, and it has saved the lives of patients infected with disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to standard antibiotic drugs. In so doing it has forced the medical profession to rethink its position on the therapeutic properties of natural products. This book chronicles the remarkable 'rags-to-riches' story of manuka honey, as seen through the eyes of a New Zealand beekeeping specialist who watched it unfold from the very beginning. It's a great tale of science, in which an inquisitive university lecturer found something totally unexpected in a product everyone had written off. It's also an entertaining account of the way that seemingly simple discovery caught the international media's attention, helping enterprising New Zealanders to develop manuka honey-based products and take them all around the globe. But above all else it's a story of hope for the future, sounding a note of optimism in a world that for good reason feels saddened and sometimes even afraid about the future of the special relationship we humans have always had with those marvellous creatures, the honey bees.

Cliff Van Eaton is a well-known writer on beekeeping subjects and is co-author of two books on bee diseases used by beekeepers in New Zealand and overseas. For over 30 years he worked as a beekeeping adviser and consultant in New Zealand, and has also assisted beekeepers in countries as diverse as the Solomon Islands, Uruguay and Vietnam.

Deep Space: Beyond the Solar System to the End of the Universe and the Beginning of Time

by Govert Schilling                                       RRP $40Deep Space

After a brief and condensed review of the solar system at the beginning of the book--including an explanation of the sun, planets and small bodies including asteroids and comets--Deep Space picks up where Solar System left off, at the outer edges of our inter-stellar neighborhood. Join author Govert Schilling on a journey that will ignite the imagination and propel you from the threshold of our galaxy through the Milky Way to the outer edges of the universe and beyond. Learn about the birth of new stars in our own galaxy (from molecular clouds to protoplanetary disks); other planets beyond our own solar system (lava worlds, water worlds and even Earth-like places); and other galaxies beyond the Milky Way (starburst galaxies, lenticular galaxies, elliptical galaxies). The book concludes with a discussion of cosmic evolution, the remaining mysteries concerning dark matter and dark energy, life in the universe and the speculative idea of a "multiverse" consisting of numerous parallel universes. 400 photographs (many never-before-seen) and custom-drawn illustrations illuminate the text, including a Star Atlas that shows the full celestial sky, all 88 constellations, all naked-eye stars and dozens of nebulae, star clusters and galaxies.

Govert Schilling is an internationally acclaimed astronomy journalist and writer from the Netherlands. He has written dozens of books on a wide variety of astronomical topics and he is a regular contributor to New Scientist, Sky at Night magazine and Sky & Telescope.

The Unbakery: Raw Organic Goodness by Megan MayUnbakery

RRP $60

The unbakery book is a celebration of the food served by the award-winning little bird unbakery. Little bird is the creation of partners Megan May and her husband Jeremy. Megan is the chef and creator of the little bird flavour and Jeremy, an award-winning architect and designer, is the brains behind the branding. The book encourages food lovers to try more uncooked food and shows them how they can enjoy and benefit from preparing dishes from raw, natural ingredients. All recipes are gluten, dairy and cane sugar free, along with being vegan. Emphasis is placed on the quality of the food and how the recipes can easily be incorporated into the readers' current lifestyle.

100 Best Native Plants for New Zealand Gardens by Fiona Eadie100 best native plants

RRP $45

Since its first publication, this book has been an indispensable guide for gardeners wishing to use New Zealand plants. Now extensively revised, it features inspirational and practical advice on 100 species that are easy to grow and maintain, across a range of climates. It lists each plant's likes and dislikes and gives sage advice for care and maintenace and for combatting pests and problems. It suggests how your soil can be best prepared for maximum growing results and gives creative landscaping tips for combining textures and forms to maximum effect. Engagingly written by the head gardener at Larnach Castle, whose gardens are world-renowned, it deserves a place on every gardener's book shelf.

iWhy Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor's Guide to the Immune System by Idan Ben-BarakWhy Aren't we dead yet?

RRP $35

Disease - specifically infectious disease - is what eventually kills the overwhelming majority of us. In fact, it's amazing that it doesn't get us sooner: we fight off millions of disease-causing germs every day. So how come we're not dead yet? In this lively and accessible book, Idan Ben-Barak tells us why. He explores the immune system and what keeps it running, how germs are destroyed, and why we develop immunities to certain disease-causing agents. He also examines the role of antibiotics and vaccines, and looks at what the future holds for our collective chances of not being dead. This is entertaining and thoughtful science writing to inspire the student interested in a career in medicine or immunology, or to inform the reader who just wants to understand more about their body while having a laugh along the way.

South Sea Vagabonds by J.W.Wray(75th Anniversary Edition)South Sea

RRP $45

The timeless New Zealand classic of adventure at sea.  Johnny Wray's gripping and often hilarious account of his adventures around the South Pacific has inspired readers and changed lives since its first publication 75 years ago. Fired from his day job during the Great Depression, Johnny took it as sign from God, and taught himself how to build and sail a boat. Then, with some mates for company and a sextant to steer by, he set sail in his famous yacht Ngataki for the palm-fringed atolls and islands of his dreams - to discover they really did exist. But South Sea Vagabonds is much more than just a ripping yarn; it is a heartfelt hymn to the possibility of living a free life and truly being the master of one's own destiny.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony DoerrAll the ligth we cannot see

RRP $35

The epic new novel, set during WW2, from Sunday Times Short Story Prize-winner Anthony Doerr. Marie-Laure has been blind since the age of six. Her father builds a perfect miniature of their Paris neighbourhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. But when the Nazis invade, father and daughter flee with a dangerous secret. Werner is a German orphan, destined to labour in the same mine that claimed his father's life, until he discovers a knack for engineering. His talent wins him a place at a brutal military academy, but his way out of obscurity is built on suffering. At the same time, far away in a walled city by the sea, an old man discovers new worlds without ever setting foot outside his home. But all around him, impending danger closes in. Doerr's combination of soaring imagination and meticulous observation is electric. As Europe is engulfed by war and lives collide unpredictably, 'All The Light We Cannot See' is a captivating and devastating elegy for innocence.

'Far more than a conventional war story, It's a tightly focused epic revolving around two unusual main characters ... Doerr paints with a rich palette, using prose that resonates deeply and conveys the ephemera of daily existence along with high drama, sadness and hope ... A bittersweet and moving novel that lingers in the mind' Clifford Beal, Daily Mail 'This novel will be a piece of luck for anyone with a long plane journey or beach holiday ahead. It is such a page-turner, entirely absorbing... [Doerr's] attention to detail is magnificent' Carmen Callil, Guardian. 'This jewel of a story is put together like a vintage timepiece ... Doerr's writing and imagery are stunning. It's been a while since a novel had me under its spell in this fashion.' Abraham Verghese, author of 'Cutting for Stone'

Seedtime: On the History, Husbandry, Politics and Promise of Seeds by Scott ChaskeySeedtime

RRP $30

Scott Chaskey--working farmer, poet, and spiritual father of the community farming movement--considers "the web of biodiversity and resilience at the heart of our cultural inheritance" by masterfully weaving history, politics, botany, literature, mythology, and memoir into a beautiful and instructive book.It's hard to think of a subject more fundamental to the sustenance of the human race than seeds. Having coevolved with the Earth's plants, insects, and animals, seeds are entwined with the core myths of ancient cultures and the development of human consciousness. Their story remains vitally important today, as the corporations that manufacture GMOs threaten our food security and the future of seed-cultivated agriculture.The stakes, for those concerned with preserving biodiversity and ecological integrity, are high.Balancing a wide view of politics and history, Chaskey alights from life on the farm he has cultivated for 25 years to conjure Gregor Mendel's breeding experiments that yielded our modern understanding of genetics; he also introduces us to several "bioneers," such as the geobotanist Nikolay Vavilov and agriculturalist Cary Fowler, who are preserving global biodiversity through seeds. Integrating scholarship with accessible storytelling, "Seedtime "is a celebration as well as a call to action urging us to renew our role as citizens of nature, in ecologist Aldo Leopold's phrase, not as conquerors of it.

The Quest for a Moral Compass by Kenan MalikA Moral Compass

RRP $40

In this remarkable and groundbreaking book, Kenan Malik explores the history of moral thought as it has developed over three millennia, from Homer's Greece to Mao's China, from ancient India to modern America. Engaging and provocative, The Quest for a Moral Compass confronts some of humanity's deepest questions. It also brings morality down to earth, showing how, throughout history, social needs and political desires have shaped moral thinking. It is a history of the world told through the history of moral thought, and a history of moral thought that casts new light on global history at a time of great social turbulence and moral uncertainty.

Kenan Malik is a writer, lecturer and broadcaster. He is a presenter of Analysis of BBC Radio 4, and a panelist on The Moral Maze. He has taught at universities in Britain, Europe, Australia and the USA, presented many TV documentaries and writes regularly for newspapers across the world including the New York Times, the Guardian, Goteborgs-Posten and the Australian. His books include Man, Beast and Zombie, Strange Fruit and From Fatwa to Jihad, which was shortlisted for the 2010 Orwell Book Prize.

Talk Like TED: The 9 Public Speaking Secrets of the World's Top Minds by Carmine GalloTalk like Ted

RRP $30

TED talks have redefined the elements of a successful presentation and become the gold standard for public speaking around the world. TED and associated Tedx conferences are held in more than 130 countries and are being viewed at a rate of 1.5 million times a day. These are presentations that set the world on fire, and the techniques that top TED speakers use are the same ones that will make any presentation more dynamic, fire up any team, and give anyone the confidence to overcome their fear of public speaking. Communications coach and bestselling author of The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs, Carmine Gallo has broken down the top TED talks and interviewed the most popular TED presenters as well as the top researchers in the fields of psychology communications to get their cutting-edge insights and to reveal the 9 secrets of all successful TED presentations. From 'Unleashing the Master Within' and 'Delivering Jaw Dropping Moments' to 'Sticking to the 18-minute Rule' Gallo provides a step-by-step method that makes it possible for anyone to create, design, and deliver a TED-style presentation that is engaging, persuasive, and memorable. Ideas are the true currency of the 21st century, and Carmine Gallo's Talk Like TED gives readers a way to create presentations around the ideas that matter most to them, presentations that will energize their audiences to spread those ideas, launch new initiatives, and reach their highest goals.

         

CapitalCapital: A Portrait of Twenty-first Century Delhi by Rana Dasgupta

RRP $45

At the turn of the twenty-first century acclaimed novelist Rana Dasgupta arrived in the Indian capital with a single suitcase. He had no intention of staying for long. But the city beguiled him - he 'fell in love and in hate with it' - and, fourteen years later, Delhi has become his home. Capital tells the story of Delhi's journey from walled city to world city. It is a story of extreme wealth and power, of land grabs and a cityscape changed almost beyond recognition. Everything that was slow, intimate and idiosyncratic has become fast, vast and generic; every aspect of life has been affected - for the poor, the middle classes and the super-rich. Through a series of fascinating personal encounters Dasgupta takes us inside the intoxicating, sometimes terrifying transformation of India's fastest-growing megacity, offering an astonishing 'report from the global future'.

Rana Dasgupta won the 2010 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best Book for his debut novel, Solo. He is also the author of the highly praised story collection Tokyo Cancelled. Capital is his first work of non-fiction.

'A beautifully written portrait of a corrupt, violent and traumatised city growing so fast it is almost unrecognisable to its own inhabitants. An astonishing tour de force by a major writer at the peak of his powers.' -- William Dalrymple 'The interviews at the core of the book are a cleverly tangential way to investigate a city that is among the world's largest - about 22m people live in and around Delhi - and has been made a microcosm of India by the hundreds of thousands who arrive each year as migrants.' Financial Times

The World We Made: Alex McKay's Story from 2050 by Jonathon PorrittWorld We Made

RRP $55

Our planet's environmental future is usually described in terms of doom and despair. But now, for the first time, The World We Made presents a credible, positive vision of our planet that is green, fair, connected and collaborative. Part history, part personal memoir, The World We Made reveals how it is possible to reach a genuinely sustainable world by 2050; describing the key events, technological breakthroughs and lifestyle revolutions that will transform our planet. Packed with images that bring to life this exciting, high-tech and human world, featuring futuristic photographs, graphics and hand-drawn sketches, The World We Made covers topics as wide-ranging as the 'energy internet' to slow travel airships; 3D printing to robotics; and personal genomics to urban agriculture - all grounded in cutting edge technological insights. Providing all the tools and advice to prepare yourself for what is ahead, the book is essential reading for everyone interested in a positive future for our planet. All royalties will go to support the work of Forum for the Future, one of the world's leading sustainable development non-profits.

Jonathon Porritt has been a renowned figure in the world of sustainable development for the last 40 years. A former Director of Friends of the Earth, he is the founder director of Forum for the Future, and eminent commentator, author and broadcaster. He has been closely involved in developing the sustainability strategies for companies like Unilever, Nike, Pepsi, M&S, Telefonica and Carillion, and is an advisor to the Prince of Wales and many other leaders in the field.

Out Of The Ordinary

Stik - $60Stik

From the publishers behind Banksy's mega-selling Wall and Piece, comes the fully-illustrated, beautifully presented book by feted London street artist, Stik. Stik first came to notoriety as an underground street artist who painted life-size stick figures during the night around London's East End. As a firm believer in the right to protest, the freedom of speech, and basic human rights, Stik has now painted murals in cities, towns and villages all over the world, focusing his work in communities which have not been afraid to express themselves in the face of repression and disenfranchisement. Having gained an international following, Stik credits his audience with the intelligence to fill in the details with just six lines and two dots to imply emotion. Each piece is a meditation. This is the first collected volume of his work to date. It reveals the political and artistic inspiration behind the work of one of this country's most brilliant and inspiring artists.

Stik is an outsider artist, having never been through further education. During periods of homelessness, in order to make ends meet, he regularly worked as an artist's life model at the Royal Academy of Art and Central Saint Martin's. It was here that he gained an accidental education in fine art. Stik now travels the world painting giant murals and bringing awareness and aid to the dispossessed and homeless wherever he goes. He lives in London.


Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends on it - $28Curious

'I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious' Albert Einstein. Everyone is born curious. But only some retain the habits of exploring, learning and discovering as they grow older. Which side of the 'curiosity divide' are you on? In Curious Ian Leslie makes a passionate case for the cultivation of our desire to know. Curious people tend to be smarter, more creative and more successful. But at the very moment when the rewards of curiosity have never been higher, it is misunderstood and undervalued, and increasingly practised only by a cognitive elite. Drawing on fascinating research from psychology, sociology and business, Curious looks at what feeds curiosity and what starves it, and uncovers surprising answers. Curiosity isn't a quality you can rely on to last a lifetime, but a mental muscle that atrophies without regular exercise. It's not a gift, but a habit that parents, schools, workplaces and individuals need to nurture if it is to thrive. Filled with inspiring stories, case studies and practical advice, Curious will change the way you think about your ownmental life, and that of those around you.

'A lovely, erudite exploration of what it is that makes us human' Independent on Sunday. Independent on Sunday 'Stuffed with facts, ideas, questions, quotes, musings, findings, puzzles, mysteries, and stories, this is a book - as Montaigne said of travel - with which to 'rub and polish'one's brain. It's the most delightful thing I've read about the mind in quite some time' New York Times. New York Times

Janette Turner Hospital Collected Stories ( New Edition) - $30Janette Turner Hospital

This collection brings together in one distinguished volume a range of stories written over twenty-five years by this internationally acclaimed author. Janette Turner Hospital's sensuous prose reveals the inner lives of a fascinating gallery of characters caught between cultures. Some cross borders of class, gender and race, dislocated in unfamiliar and unpredictable physical worlds; others cross borders between the past and the present, blurring memory and perception in moments of crisis and illumination. 'If anything is capable of restoring your faith in the power of short fiction, this is it ...there's no question this book marks Turner Hospital as one of the genre's finest exponents ...Hospital's fiction reads like a quest for the perfectly cadenced sentence.' The Age 'The best of her stories are like brief cyclones wrapped around an unexpected centre of calm.' Los Angeles Times 'One of the most elegant prose styles in the business.' The Times 'Sensuous, speculative fictions about the experience of dislocation ...Stories develop like poems or meditations.' New York Times

Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes - $19Beyond Measure

A powerful manifesto for CEOs and employees alike, this book reveals how organizations can make huge changes with surprisingly small steps. In an age of 'radical' shifts and 'disruption', business leader Margaret Heffernan lays the groundwork for a new kind of thinking, arguing that organizations can create seismic shifts by making deceptively small changes such as using every mind on the team, celebrating mistakes and encouraging time off from work. A popular TED speaker, Heffernan is a wise and witty storyteller who fully engages her reader at every turn. Filled with incredible anecdotes and startling statistics, she takes us on a fascinating tour across the globe, highlighting disparate business and revealing how they've managed to change themselves in big ways through incremental shifts.

2071: The World We'll Leave Our Grandchildren - $202071

How has the climate changed in the past? How is it changing now? How do we know? And what kind of a future do we want to create?

Chris Rapley is Professor of Climate Science at University College London. He is a Fellow of St Edmund's College, Cambridge, a Distinguished Visiting Scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a member of the Academia Europaea, a board member of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, Chairman of the European Space Agency Director General's High Level Science Policy Advisory Committee, and Chairman of the London Climate Change Partnership, committed to ensuring London's resilience to climate change. Professor Rapley was awarded the 2008 Edinburgh Science Medal for having made 'a significant contribution to the understanding and wellbeing of humanity'. He was made a Commander of the British Empire in 2003. Duncan Macmillan is an award-winning writer and theatre director.

2071 is better than good: it is necessary - Guardian An engrossing overview of the most urgent issue of the century - The Times Pretty essential if you want a sensible overview on what is happening to our planet - Time Out Urgent and accessible. It's also hard to argue with, and scary. Essential reading ahead of December's key UN Climate Change conference -  Evening Standard


On Palestine - $18.00On Palestine

Noam Chomsky and Ilan Pappe's indispensable update on a suffering region. Operation Protective Edge, Israel's most recent assault on Gaza, left thousands of Palestinians dead and cleared the way for another Israeli land grab. The need to stand in solidarity with Palestinians has never been greater. Noam Chomsky and Ilan Pappe, two leading voices in the struggle to liberate Palestine, discuss the road ahead for Palestinians and how the international community can pressure Israel to end its human rights abuses against the people of Palestine. This urgent and timely book offers hope and a way forward for all those committed to the struggle to liberate Palestine. On Palestine is the sequel to Chomsky and Pappe's acclaimed book Gaza in Crisis.

Off the Map: Lost Spaces, Invisible Cities, Forgotten Islands, Feral Places and What They Tell Us About the World - $30off the map

In a world of Google Earth, in which it is easy to believe that every discovery has been made and every adventure already had, Off the Map is a stunning testament to how mysterious our planet still is. From forgotten enclaves to floating islands, from hidden villages to New York gutter spaces, Off the Map charts the hidden corners of our planet. And while these are not necessarily places you would choose to visit on holiday - Hobyo, the pirate capital of Somalia, or Zheleznogorsk, a secret military town in Russia - they each carry a story about the strangeness of place and our need for a geography that understands our hunger for the fantastic and the unexpected. But it also shows us that topophilia, the love of place, is a fundamental part of what it is to be human. Whether you are an urban explorer or an armchair traveller, Off the Map will inspire and enchant. You'll never look at a map in quite the same way again.

'A fizzingly entertaining and enlightening book' Daily Telegraph 'Mesmerising' Geographical Magazine 'A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten lost places. But it's not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psycho-geography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums.' Wanderlust

The Festival of Insignificance - $28Festival of

The new novel from Milan Kundera. Casting light on the most serious of problems and at the same time saying not one serious sentence; being fascinated by the reality of the contemporary world and at the same time completely avoiding realism - that's The Festival of Insignificance. Readers who know Kundera's earlier books know that the wish to incorporate an element of the "unserious" in a novel is not at all unexpected of him. In Immortality, Goethe and Hemingway stroll through several chapters together talking and laughing. And in Slowness, Vera, the author's wife, says to her husband: "you've often told me you meant to write a book one day that would have not a single serious word in it...I warn you: watch out. Your enemies are lying in wait." Now, far from watching out, Kundera is finally and fully realizing his old aesthetic dream in this novel that we could easily view as a summation of his whole work. A strange sort of summation. Strange sort of epilogue. Strange sort of laughter, inspired by our time, which is comical because it has lost all sense of humor. 

Shadows in the Vineyard: The True Story of a Plot to Poison the World's Greatest Wine - $35Shadows

When Maximilian Potter went to Burgundy to report for Vanity Fair on a crime that could have destroyed the Domaine de la Romanee Conti-the tiny, storied vineyard that produces the most expensive, exquisite wines in the world-he soon found a story that was much larger, and more thrilling, than he had originally imagined. In January 2010, Aubert de Villaine, the famed proprietor of the DRC, received an anonymous note threatening the destruction of his priceless vines by poison-a crime that in the world of high-end wine is akin to murder-unless he paid a one million euro ransom. Villaine believed it to be a sick joke, but that proved a fatal miscalculation; the crime was committed and shocked this fabled region of France. The sinister story that Potter uncovered would lead to a sting operation by top Paris detectives, the primary suspect's suicide, and a dramatic trial. This botanical crime threatened to destroy the fiercely traditional culture surrounding the world's greatest wine. Like Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, SHADOW IN THE VINEYARD takes us deep into a captivating world full of fascinating characters, small town French politics, an unforgettable narrative, and a local culture defined by the twinned veins of excess and vitality and the deep reverent attention to the land that run through it.

Zizz!: The Life and Art of Len Lye - $30Zizz

Born in Christchurch in 1901, Len Lye was driven by a lifelong passion for motion and energy, and how to represent them in art. He moved to London, where he exhibited with Frances Hodgkins and Henry Moore, and then to New York, where he became renowned as a film-maker and kinetic sculptor. Today his work is held in the collections of major art museums, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago and Centre Pompidou in Paris. In 1977, Lye returned to New Zealand for the first local exhibition of his work. Shortly before his death three years later, the Len Lye Foundation was established, and he bequeathed it his work. New Plymouth's Govett-Brewster Art Gallery is home to this amazing collection. In July 2015 the city council is opening a stunning, architecturally designed centre devoted to Lye's art and ideas.

Roger Horrocks was Len Lye s assistant in New York during 1980, the last year of the expatriate New Zealand artist and filmmaker s life. He is the author of "Art That Moves: The Work of Len Lye" and has also curated exhibitions of Lye s work, directed an award-winning film about him, and written the libretto for "Len Lye: The Opera."

The Hipster Colouring Book - $20Hipster

We all know who the hipster are - or do we? Discover the hip people of this world in all their habitats: the coffee shop, the flea market, the queue for an indie film show. Find out what they keep in their vintage bag, how they like their shoes, how they get to work, and what they get up to at the weekend. Enjoy the hairstyles, the pets, the tattoos and the bicycles, and discover what they really keep in their store cupboards. In this collection of 36 illustrations to colour in, (hip) illustrator Charlotte Farmer leaves no coffee pot unpercolated in the hipster domain. Drawing on her keen observation of hipster settlements, she has created the book every hip person will pretend not to want, and you never know, as you colour in these beautiful drawings, you too may find your inner hipster.

Nothing is True and Everything is Possible: Adventures in Modern Russia - $37Nothing is true

A journey into the glittering, surreal heart of 21st century Russia: into the lives of Hells Angels convinced they are messiahs, professional killers with the souls of artists, bohemian theatre directors turned Kremlin puppet-masters, supermodel sects, post-modern dictators and oligarch revolutionaries. This is a world erupting with new money and new power, changing so fast it breaks all sense of reality, where life is seen as a whirling, glamorous masquerade where identities can be switched and all values are changeable. It is home to a new form of authoritarianism, far subtler than 20th century strains, and which is rapidly expanding to challenge the global order. An extraordinary book - one which is as powerful and entertaining as it is troubling - Nothing is True and Everything is Possible offers a wild ride into this political and ethical vacuum.

"Pomerantsev is one of the most brilliant observers of Putin's Russia...an electrifying, terrifying book." (Anne Applebaum). "Unflinching, tragic and profound." (AD Miller, author of SNOWDROPS).

The Seven Good Years - $35Etgar

A brilliant, hilarious memoir from a master storyteller. The seven years between the birth of Etgar Keret's son, Lev, and the death of his father were good years, but still full of reasons to worry. Lev was born in the middle of a terrorist attack in Tel Aviv. Etgar's father became sick. And Etgar has been constantly tormented by nightmarish visions of the former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, anti-Semitic remarks both real and imagined, and, perhaps most worrisome of all, a dogged telemarketer who seems likely to chase him to the grave. Emerging from these darkly absurd circumstances is a series of funny, touching ruminations on everything from his three-year-old son's impending military service to the terrorist mindset behind Angry Birds. The Seven Good Years is a tender and entertaining tale of a father bringing up his son in a country beset by wars and alarms. Told in Etgar's inimitable style, this wise, witty memoir is full of wonder and love, poignant insights, and irrepressible humour. Moving deftly between the personal and the political, the playful and the profound, it reveals the human need to find good in the least likely places, and the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of our capricious world.

Gut: the Inside Story of Our Body's Most Under-Rated Organ - $37Gut

One of the keys to living a happier, healthier life is inside us. Our gut is almost as important to us as our brain or our heart, yet we know very little about how it works. In Gut, Giulia Enders shows that rather than the utilitarian and - let's be honest - somewhat embarrassing body part we imagine it to be, it is one of the most complex, important, and even miraculous parts of our anatomy. And scientists are only just discovering quite how much it has to offer; new research shows that gut bacteria can play a role in everything from obesity and allergies to Alzheimer's. Beginning with the personal experience of illness that inspired her research, and going on to explain everything from the basics of nutrient absorption to the latest science linking bowel bacteria with depression, Enders has written an entertaining, informative health handbook. Gut definitely shows that we can all benefit from getting to know the wondrous world of our inner workings. In this charming book, young scientist Giulia Enders takes us on a fascinating tour of our insides. Her message is simple - if we treat our gut well, it will treat us well in return. But how do we do that? And why do we need to? Find out in this surprising, and surprisingly funny, exploration of the least understood of our organs.

On the Beach at Night Alone - $3Whitman

The visionary nineteenth-century poet, Walt Whitman, celebrates nature and the human spirit in these verses from Leaves of Grass.

Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 pocket sized selections for Penguin's 80th birthday.  Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Whitman's works available in Penguin Classics are Leaves of Grass and The Complete Poems.

The Good Story: Exchanges on Truth, Fiction and Psychotherapy - $48the good story

This is a fascinating dialogue on the human inclination to make up stories between a Nobel Prize-winning writer and a psychotherapist. Arabella Kurtz and J M Coetzee consider psychotherapy and its wider social context from different perspectives, but at the heart of both their approaches is a concern with stories. Working alone, the writer is in sole charge of the story he or she tells. The therapist, on the other hand, collaborates with the patient in telling the story of their life. What kind of truth do the stories created by patient and therapist aim to uncover: objective truth or the shifting and subjective truth of memories explored and re-experienced in the safety of the therapeutic relationship? The authors discuss both individual psychology and the psychology of the group: the school classroom, the gang, the settler nation where the brutal deeds of the ancestors have to be accommodated into a national story. Drawing on great writers like Cervantes and Dostoevsky and on psychoanalysts like Freud and Melanie Klein, they offer illuminating insights into the stories we tell of our lives.

Another Great Day at Sea - $37Another Great Day at sea

As a child Geoff Dyer spent long hours making and blotchily painting model fighter planes. So the adult Dyer jumped at the chance of a residency aboard an aircraft carrier. Another Great Day at Sea chronicles Dyer's experiences on the USS George H.W. Bush as he navigates the routines and protocols of 'carrier-world', from the elaborate choreography of the flight deck through miles of walkways and hatches to kitchens serving meals for a crew of five thousand to the deafening complexity of catapult and arresting gear. Meeting the Captain, the F-18 pilots and the dentists, experiencing everything from a man-overboard alert to the Steel Beach Party, Dyer guides us through the most AIE (acronym intensive environment) imaginable. A lanky Englishman (could he really be both the tallest and the oldest person on the ship?) in a deeply American world, with its constant exhortations to improve, to do better, Dyer brilliantly records the daily life on board the ship, revealing it to be a prism for understanding a society where discipline and conformity, dedication and optimism, become forms of self-expression. In the process it becomes clear why Geoff Dyer has been widely praised as one of the most original - and funniest - voices in literature. Another Great Day at Sea is the definitive work of an author whose books defy definition.

Soil * Soul * Society: A New Trinity for Our Time - $26Soil soul society

We are all members of a one-earth society, and caring for the earth and soul is interrelated. This is the message of Satish Kumar, the internationally-respected peace and environment activist who has been gently setting the agenda for change for over 50 years. In Soil, Soul & Society, Satish presents the new trinity for our age of sustainability. One that shares the knowledge that we ourselves are very much part of nature; that what we do to nature we in fact do to ourselves; and that the earth is soulful. In this book, he inspires readers with the knowledge we are all leaders and can create change. He urges readers to create a new consciousness that reveres nature and explores how, as a global society, we need to embrace diversity and become pilgrims on this earth not tourists. To bring about change in the world we must be the change we wish to see.

Satish is long standing editor of Resurgence & Ecologist magazine, and co-founder of the Schumacher College. 

The Salmon Who Dared to Leap Higher - $25Salmon

The life of the salmon is a predictable one: swimming upstream to the place of its birth to spawn, and then to die. This is the story of a salmon whose silver scales mark him out as different - who dares to leap beyond his fate. It's a story about growing up, and about aching and ardent love. For swimming upstream means pursuing something the salmon cannot see: a dream. Translated for the first time into English, The Salmon Who Dared To Leap Higher is a  tender, inspiring and life-affirming modern fable about finding freedom and a harmony with nature we have either forgotten or lost in the binding realities of life.  Ahn Do-hyun is a multi-million bestselling, award-winning Korean poet. 


Berry Boys: Portraits of First World War Soldiers and Families - $55Berry boys

Berry & Co, established in 1897 by William Berry, was a Wellington photographic studio producing commissioned portraits for the first decades of the twentieth century. In the 1990s, a tenant of 147 Cuba Street, Wellington, discovered around 3,000 glass plate negatives in a cupboard. This transpired to be the remarkable Berry & Co Collection. Amongst the studio portraits in the collection are around 130 showing ordinary World War One servicemen in uniforms, sometimes posing with families and friends. Many of these would have been taken before the men left to fight, or while on leave from the European theatres of war. Together, they offer a potent snapshot of the New Zealand of the time - and the changing face of the war itself. Publishedby Te Papa Press to coincide with the national screening of the TVNZ documentary last year, Berry Boys: Portraits of World War One Soldiers and Families features the full collection of beautifully reproduced portraits, accompanied by the unique and carefully researched stories of the soldiers and their loved ones, including many that have only recently come to light. Though these soldiers represent only a tiny fraction of the thousands of men who departed to join the fighting overseas, through their poignant stories we are granted a remarkable lens on New Zealanders' experiences - their hope, anxiety, fear, pride and love - over the span of the Frist World War.

Consolations of the Forest: Alone in a Cabin in the Middle Taiga - $30Consolations

Sylvain Tesson, found a radical solution to his need for freedom, one as ancient as the experiences of the hermits of old Russia: he decided to lock himself alone in a cabin in the middle taiga, on the shores of Lake Baikal in Siberia, for six months. Noting carefully his impressions of the silence, Sylvain Tesson shares with us an extraordinary experience.

"For anyone who secretly dreams of a life that's both simpler and more physically demanding, Tesson's descriptions of bruised-looking Siberian sunsets and Baikal in the rain are a draft of cool air...There's humour and humanity here, but also a serious attempt to answer the question, "How should a person live?' - Jessica Holland, Guardian.

Writer, journalist and traveller, Sylvain Tesson is France's 'most brilliant travel writer' (L'Express). After a world tour by bicycle in 1993-1994, he developed a passion for Central Asia, and in 1997 he crossed the Himalayas on foot. For seven months in 2003, he followed the journey of escapees from the Gulag, which brought him to international prominence with his remarkable travelogue, Axis of Wolf. Consolations of the Forest won the Prix Medicis in 2011.

Capitalism: A Ghost Story - $29Capitalism

India is a nation of 1.2 billion, but the country's 100 richest people own assets equivalent to one-fourth of India's gross domestic product. The rest of the population are ghosts within a system beyond their control. This includes the millions that live on less than $2 a day; or the hundreds of thousands of farmers who commit suicide, unable to escape ruinous debts; where dalits are driven from their villages because the owners want to turn the land to agribusiness. These are examples of a 'gush up' economy that has corrupted contemporary India. Capitalism: A Ghost Story examines the dark side of democracy, and shows how the demands of globalized capitalism has subjugated billions of people to racism and exploitation. It is a ferocious attack on the mega corporations that treat India's natural resources like robber barons, and how they have been able to influence every part of the nation from the government to the army in the rush for profit. But, as Arundhati Roy passionately argues, capitalism is in crisis. The cracks are starting to show in its facade.

"An unflinching emotional as well as political intelligence. Her lucid and probing essays offer sharp insights on a range of matters, from crony capitalism and environmental depredation to the perils of nationalism. - Time Magazine In her searing account, Roy asks whether our shriveled forms of democracy will be 'the endgame of the human race' - and shows vividly why this is a prospect not to be lightly dismissed. - Noam Chomsky

I Think You'll Find it's a Bit More Complicated Than That - $35I think

The very best journalism from one of Britain's most admired and outspoken science writers, author of the bestselling Bad Science and Bad Pharma. In 'Bad Science', Ben Goldacre hilariously exposed the tricks that quacks and journalists use to distort science. In 'Bad Pharma', he put the $600 billion global pharmaceutical industry under the microscope. Now the pick of the journalism by one of our wittiiest, most indignant and most fearless commentators on the worlds of medicine and science is collected in one volume, with over hundred of his funniest and most skilful take-downs. For those who care about the integrity of the media, medicine and politicians, this book is essential; reading.

Ben Goldacre is a doctor, writer, broadcaster and academic who specialises in unpicking dodgy scientific claims from drug companies, newspapers, government reports, PR people and quacks. His first book, Bad Science, reached Number One in the non-fiction charts, sold over 400,000 copies in the UK alone, and has been translated into 25 languages.

H is for Hawk - $40Hawk

This is longlisted for the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize. 'In real life, goshawks resemble sparrowhawks the way leopards resemble housecats. Bigger, yes. But bulkier, bloodier, deadlier, scarier, and much, much harder to see. Birds of deep woodland, not gardens, they're the birdwatchers' dark grail.' As a child Helen Macdonald was determined to become a falconer. She learned the arcane terminology and read all the classic books, including T. H. White's tortured masterpiece, The Goshawk, which describes White's struggle to train a hawk as a spiritual contest. When her father dies and she is knocked sideways by grief, she becomes obsessed with the idea of training her own goshawk. She buys Mabel for GBP800 on a Scottish quayside and takes her home to Cambridge. Then she fills the freezer with hawk food and unplugs the phone, ready to embark on the long, strange business of trying to train this wildest of animals. 'To train a hawk you must watch it like a hawk, and so gain the ability to predict what it will do next. Eventually you don't see the hawk's body language at all. You seem to feel what it feels. The hawk's apprehension becomes your own. As the days passed and I put myself in the hawk's wild mind to tame her, my humanity was burning away.' Destined to be a classic of nature writing, H is for Hawk an unflinchingly honest account of Macdonald's struggle with grief during the difficult process of the hawk's taming and her own untaming. At the same time, it's a kaleidoscopic biography of the brilliant and troubled novelist T. H. White, best known for The Once and Future King. It's a book about memory, nature and nation, and how it might be possible to try to reconcile death with life and love.

"It just sings. I couldn't stop reading." -- Mark Haddon "This beautiful book is at once heartfelt and clever in the way it mixes elegy with celebration: elegy for a father lost, celebration of a hawk found - and in the finding also a celebration of countryside, forbears of one kind and another, life-in-death. At a time of very distinguished writing about the relationship between human kind and the environment, it is immediately pre-eminent." -- Andrew Motion "H is for Hawk is a dazzling piece of work: deeply affecting, utterly fascinating and blazing with love and intelligence... The result is a deeply human work shot through...with intelligence and compassion... I will be surprised if a better book that H is for Hawk is published this year." -- Melissa Harrison Financial Times "I'm convinced it's going to be an absolute classic of nature writing." -- Nick Barley Guardian

Being Mortal: Ageing, Illness, Medicine, and What Matters in the End - $35Gawande

Gawande examines his experiences as a surgeon, as he confronts the realities of aging and dying in his patients and in his family, as well as the limits of what he can do. And he emerges with story that crosses the globe and history, exploring questions that range from the curious to the profound: What happens to people's teeth as they get old? Did human beings really commit senecide, the sacrifice of the elderly? Why do the aged so dread nursing homes and hospitals? How should someone give another person the dreadful news that they will die? This is a story told only as Atul Gawande can - penetrating people's lives and also the systems that have evolved to govern our mortality. Those systems, he observes, routinely fail to serve - or even acknowledge - people's needs and priorities beyond mere survival. And the consequences are devastating lives, families, and even whole economies. But, as he reveals, it doesn't have to be this way. Atul Gawande has delivered an engrossing tale of science, history and remarkable characters in the vein of Oliver Sacks.

Atul Gawande is a surgeon, writer and public health researcher. He practices general and endocrine surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He is also Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School and Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. He writes regularly for the New Yorker, and is the author of Better ,Complications and The Checklist Manifesto.

What We See When We Read - $35What we see

A unique, fully illustrated exploration into the phenomenology of reading--how we visualize images from reading works of literature, from one of our very best book jacket designers, himself a passionate reader. What do we see when we read? Did Tolstoy really describe Anna Karenina? Did Melville ever really tell us what, exactly, Ishmael looked like? The collection of fragmented images on a page--a graceful ear there, a stray curl, a hat positioned just so--and other clues and signifiers helps us to create an image of a character. But in fact our sense that we know a character intimately has little to do with our ability to concretely picture our beloved--or reviled--literary figures. In this remarkable work of nonfiction, Knopf's Associate Art Director Peter Mendelsund combines his profession, as an award-winning designer; his first career, as a classically trained pianist; and his first love, literature--he considers himself first and foremost as a reader--into what is sure to be one of the most provocative and unusual investigations into how we understand the act of reading.

The Digested Twenty-first Century - $37The Digested 21st Century

John Crace's Digested Read first appeared in the Guardian in February 2000 and has been running ever since. Each week Crace reduces a new book - anything from a Booker Prize winner to a Nigella cookery book is fair game - to 700 words in a parody of the plot, style, dialogue and themes. Or lack of them. The Digested Read has not just become an institution for readers; it is read and enjoyed by publishers and authors too. So long as it is not their book being digested. A few years ago Crace wrote Brideshead Abbreviated, A Digested Read of the 20th Century. This is the 21st Century. So far.

A swift kick up the backside to some of modern literature's most iconic works. Accurate, merciless and very, very funny. -- Sarah Waters I've read all these books at least twice - and now I've read John Crace's digested versions I wonder why I bothered. -- Will Self

Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends on it -$30Curious

'I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious' Albert Einstein. Everyone is born curious. But only some retain the habits of exploring, learning and discovering as they grow older. Which side of the 'curiosity divide' are you on? In Curious Ian Leslie makes a passionate case for the cultivation of our desire to know. Curious people tend to be smarter, more creative and more successful. But at the very moment when the rewards of curiosity have never been higher, it is misunderstood and undervalued, and increasingly practised only by a cognitive elite. Drawing on fascinating research from psychology, sociology and business, Curious looks at what feeds curiosity and what starves it, and uncovers surprising answers. Curiosity isn't a quality you can rely on to last a lifetime, but a mental muscle that atrophies without regular exercise. It's not a gift, but a habit that parents, schools, workplaces and individuals need to nurture if it is to thrive. Filled with inspiring stories, case studies and practical advice, Curious will change the way you think about your own mental life, and that of those around you.

Ian Leslie writes about ideas, culture, and politics for a wide range of publications including Intelligent Life, the New Statesman, and the Guardian, and is the creator and presenter of the BBC radio comedy, Before They Were Famous.

The Wandering Mind: What the Brain Does When You're Not Looking - $35The Wandering Mind

While psychologists write bestsellers about humans' smarter side - language, cognition, consciousness - and self-help gurus harangue us to be attentive and mindful, we all know that much of the time our minds are just goofing off. So what does the brain do when you're not looking? Rooted in neuroscience, psychology and evolutionary biology but written with Corballis' signature wit and wisdom, The Wandering Mind takes us into the world of the 'default-mode network' to tackle the big questions. What do rats dream about? What's with our fiction addiction? Is the hippocampus where free will takes a holiday? And does mind-wandering drive creativity? In Pieces of Mind, Michael Corballis took 21 short walks around the human brain. In The Wandering Mind he stretches out for a longer hike into those murky regions of the brain where dreams and religion, fiction and fantasy lurk.

Michael C. Corballis is professor emeritus at the University of Auckland. An outstanding science communicator, reviewers have hailed him for his ability to tell 'a captivating story' and writing that is 'informative and entertaining'. He is author, most recently, of The Recursive Mind: The Origins of Human Language, Thought and Civilization and Pieces of Mind: 21 Short Walks around the Human Brain, which was translated into three languages and published in three English-language editions.

Cracked: Why Psychiatry is Doing More Harm Than Good - $29Cracked

Why is psychiatry such big business? Why are so many psychiatric drugs prescribed - 47 million antidepressant prescriptions in the UK alone last year - and why, without solid scientific justification, has the number of mental disorders risen from 106 in 1952 to 374 today? The everyday sufferings and setbacks of life are now 'medicalised' into illnesses that require treatment - usually with highly profitable drugs. Psychological therapist James Davies uses his insider knowledge to illustrate for a general readership how psychiatry has put riches and medical status above patients' well-being. The charge sheet is damning: negative drug trials routinely buried; antidepressants that work no better than placebos; research regularly manipulated to produce positive results; doctors, seduced by huge pharmaceutical rewards, creating more disorders and prescribing more pills; and ethical, scientific and treatment flaws unscrupulously concealed by mass-marketing. Cracked reveals for the first time the true human cost of an industry that, in the name of helping others, has actually been helping itself. James Davies obtained his PhD in medical and social anthropology from the University of Oxford. He is also a qualified psychotherapist (having worked in the NHS), and a senior lecturer in social anthropology and psychology at the University of Roehampton, London.

'[Cracked] should be read by every doctor ... by everyone in politics and the media, not to mention any concerned citizen.' -- Peter Hitchens Mail on Sunday 'Chilling reading' -- Will Self Guardian 'Davies's book is a potent polemic' -- Bryan Appleyard Sunday Times 'If, in the world of psychiatry, the DSM is Holy Scripture, Cracked is set to become a heretical text.' -- Robert Crampton The Times Magazine 'A profoundly disturbing look at the world of Big Pharma ... This is an important book for anyone who has an interest in mental health.' Daily Mail 'Builds a disturbing picture of a profession that is in thrall to pharmaceutical companies' -- Michael Mosley BBC Focus

Humans of New York - $45

Humans of New York

An instant Number One New York Times bestseller, Humans of New York began in the summer of 2010, when photographer Brandon Stanton set out on an ambitious project: to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City. Armed with his camera, he began crisscrossing the city, covering thousands of miles on foot, all in his attempt to capture ordinary New Yorkers in the most extraordinary of moments. The result of these efforts was "Humans of New York," a vibrant blog in which he featured his photos alongside quotes and anecdotes. The blog has steadily grown, now boasting nearly a million devoted followers. Humans of New York is the book inspired by the blog. With four hundred colour photos, including exclusive portraits and all-new stories, and a distinctive vellum jacket, Humans of New York is a stunning collection of images that will appeal not just to those who have been drawn in by the outsized personalities of New York, but to anyone interested in the breathtaking scope of humanity it displays. Heartfelt and moving, Humans of New York is a celebration of individuality and a tribute to the spirit of a city.

 

You Learn by Living: Eleven Keys for a More Fulfilling Life - $25You Learn by Living

One of the most beloved figures of the twentieth century, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt remains a role model for a life well lived. At the age of seventy-six, Roosevelt penned this simple guide to living a fuller life. Now back in print for this 50th edition, "You Learn by Living" is a powerful volume of enduring commonsense ideas and heartfelt values. Offering her own philosophy on living, Eleanor takes readers on a path to compassion, confidence, maturity, civic stewardship, and more. The following are her keys to a fulfilling life: Learning to Learn; Fear - the Great Enemy; The Uses of Time; The Difficult Art of Maturity; Readjustment is endless; learning to Be Useful; the right to Be an individual; how to Get the Best out of People; Facing responsibility; how everyone Can take Part in Politics; and, learning to Be a Public servant. Informed by her personal experiences as a daughter, wife, parent, and diplomat, this book is a window into Eleanor Roosevelt herself and a trove of timeless wisdom that resonates in any era.

Eleanor Roosevelt was First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. After her husband s death in 1945, Roosevelt continued in her role as an internationally prominent author, speaker, politician, and activist. This year marks the 125th year since her birth