Maori Books

Muirs Bookshop stocks a comprehensive range of Maori art, culture, social, history and language books.  This page will keep you up to date on any new books coming and our best sellers.

History

Ake Ake Kia Kaha EAke Ake Kia Kaha E!: B Company 28th Maori Battalion 1939-1945

by Wira Gardiner

RRP $50

A truly unique insight into the impact the Second World War had on the iwi of the central North Island and Bay of Plenty districts (including Te Arawa, Ngati Tuwharetoa, Tuhoe, Whanau-a-Apanui, Ngati Maru and Ngati Paoa) focusing on the region's war effort not only overseas, but also at home and in government. Through personal recollections, eyewitness accounts, numerous anecdotes and highly illustrated throughout, the book tells the fascinating story of the B Company's war, capturing the special `spirit' of the Maori Battalion. Features over 200 images, many not seen in print before, plus hundreds of portraits of the men of B Company (650+ our of approx 900 who served) generously provided by whanau. Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Harawira "Wira" Tiri Gardiner, KNZM, is a former professional soldier, senior public servant and writer. He was contracted to write B Company's history in 2015. His tribal affiliations are Ngati Awa, Ngati Pikiao, Whakatohea and Te Whanua-a-Apanui.

Nga Tama Toa Monty SoutarNga Tama Toa: The Price of Citizenship : C Company 28 (Maori) Battalion 1939-1945
by Monty Soutar

RRP $50

The fascinating story of C Company, Maori Battalion told through personal recollections, eyewitness accounts, numerous anecdotes and fantastic photographs. At times heart-rending, at times heart-warming, this impressive book captures the special 'spirit' of the Maori Battalion - an amazing story that documents the stories of those who were actually there.

Maori People of New ZealandMaori Peoples of New Zealand: Nga Iwi o Aotearoa

RRP $50

Who are the Maori of New Zealand? How did they get here and how did they settle the country? What are the main tribal groups in New Zealand, and where are they based? The first publication to come out of the online Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand project tells the story of the tangata whenua of Aotearoa, from their journeys across the vast Pacific Ocean to the histories of all the major iwi, including the contemporary issues they face today. No other book brings together in one place all these tribal histories. Based on the latest research and generously illustrated in full colour with superb mapping and photographs, this rich resource is an essential part of 'our' nation's story and fills an important gap in the history of New Zealand.

Horouta Horouta: The History of the Horouta Canoe, Gisborne and East Coast by Rongowhakaata Halbert

RRP $120

Horouta is the definitive history of the descendants of the voyaging canoes that brought the first settlers from Polynesia to the lands that stretch from East Cape to northern Hawke's Bay.Assembled through painstaking historical and genealogical research over more than 70 years by Rongowhakaata Halbert and his family, the book includes extensive chapters based on oral and written history about the settlement of the East Coast, along with the most extensive genealogy charts for the region, and detailed maps of lands in the region.This outstanding work of scholarship is destined to serve the needs of all New Zealanders, and especially the peoples of Gisborne and the East Coast, for generations to come.

Tears of Rangi Anne SalmondTears of Rangi: Experiments Across Worlds by Anne Salmond

RRP $65

During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women's own words - the speeches and evidence, letters and testimonies that they left in the archive. Drawing from over 500 texts in both English and te reo Maori written by Maori women themselves, or expressing their words in the first person, He Reo Wahine explores the range and diversity of Maori women's concerns and interests, the many ways in which they engaged with colonial institutions, as well as their understanding and use of the law, legal documents, and the court system. The book both collects those sources - providing readers with substantial excerpts from letters, petitions, submissions and other documents - and interprets them. Eight chapters group texts across key themes: land sales, war, land confiscation and compensation, politics, petitions, legal encounters, religion and other private matters. Beside a large scholarship on New Zealand women's history, the historical literature on Maori women is remarkably thin. This book changes that by utilising the colonial archives to explore the feelings, thoughts and experiences of Maori women - and their relationships to the wider world.

takitimuTakitimu by J. H. Mitchell RRP$80

Takitimu is one of the great tribal histories in the New Zealand literary canon. It tells of the Ngati Kahungunu people - tangata whenua of Hawke's Bay and parts of East Coast and Wairarapa - from their origins in the Pacific Islands to their lineage in Aotearoa up to the twentieth century. It is divided into four main sections: the history up to the departure of Takitimu and other canoes of migration; the history of Ngati Kahungunu; short biographies of Sir James Carroll, Sir Maui Pomare and the Rev. Tamihana Huata; and appendices describing charms, proverbs, the interpretation of dreams and signs, and the Maori almanac. Complete with genealogical tables, this is a book of great value for history enthusiasts and especially the people of Ngati Kahungunu - the third largest Maori tribe, with descendants throughout New Zealand and Australia.

Te Hokowhitu a Tu by Christopher PugsleyTe Hokowhiti A Tu by Christopher Pugsley RRP$40

Maori soldiers signing up for the First World War representing a formidable fighting force - Te Hokiwhitu a Tu, or the Seventy twice-told warriors of the war god, Tumatauenga. Prejudice kept the Maori Pioneer Battalion well back from the front lines as support troops, but their war efforts won them rights as full citizens of their homelands. Drawing on rare archival material and previously unpublished diaries and letters, Te Hokowhitu a Tu is the authoritative account of Maori and Pacific Islanders in the First World War, and balances the wider story of the Pioneer Battalion's exploits with a portrait of daily life for soldiers who laboured not only against the enemy but also racism behind their own lines.

Language

Maori Made Easy WorkbookMaori Made Easy Workbooks/Kete 1-4: For everyday learners of the Maori language by Scotty Morrison

RRP$25

The accessible guide to learning the Maori language, no matter your knowledge level. Fun, user-friendly and relevant to modern readers, Scotty Morrison's Maori Made Easy workbook series is the ultimate resource for anyone wanting to learn the basics of the Maori language. While dictionaries list words and their definitions, and other language guides offer common phrases, Maori Made Easy connects the dots, allowing the reader to take control of their learning in an empowering way. By committing just 30 minutes a day for 30 weeks, learners will adopt the language easily and as best suits their busy lives. Written by popular TV personality and te reo Maori advocate Scotty Morrison, author of The Raupo Phrasebook of Modern Maori, this series of four workbooks proves that learning the language can be fun, effective - and easy!

A Maori Word a DayA Maori Word A Day by Hemi Kelly

RRP $30

A Maori Word a Day offers an easy, instant and motivating entry into the Maori language. Through its 365 Maori words, you will learn the following-- English translations- Word category, notes and background information- Sample sentences, in both te reo Maori and EnglishExploring the most common, modern and contemporary words in use today, A Maori Word a Day is the perfect way to kickstart your te reo journey!

Maori At Home Scotty MorrisonMaori At Home: An Everyday Guide To Learning The Maori Language by Scotty and Stacey Morrison

RRP $35

Kei hea o putu whutuporo? Where are your rugby boots? Homai te ranu tomatoPass me the tomato sauce Kei te pehea te huarere i tenei ra?How is the weather today? Kei hea to mahi kainga?Where is your homework? Kati te whakaporearea i to tuahine!Stop annoying your sister! Maori at Home is the perfect introduction to the Maori language. A highly practical, easy and fun resource for everyday New Zealanders, it covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household. Whether you're practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at Home gives you the words and phrases - and confidence - you need.

Culture

He Kupu Tuku IhoHe Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Maori te Tatu ki te Ao by Timoti Karetu and Wharehuia Milroy

RRP $60

Sir Timoti Karetu and Dr Wharehuia Milroy are widely recognised as two of New Zealand's leading teachers and scholars of Maori language and culture. They both taught at The University of Waikato from the 1970s and pursued an innovative approach by teaching language courses in te reo Maori, with tikanga courses taught in Maori and English. Te Wharehuia and Timoti were pioneers in this area, forging a model for teaching Maori which is now followed by many other tertiary institutions. This is a book of chapters on key aspects of Maori language and culture authored by two of this country's pre-eminent kaumatua. The authors discuss key cultural concepts (including mana, tapu, wairua, whakapapa, ritual, farewell speeches and Maori humour) as well as language and cultural issues of the modern world. The language used is an exemplar for learners and speakers of te reo Maori. With assistance from a team at Te Ipukarea, the National Maori Language Institute, who transcribed and edited structured conversations between these two kaumatua, this book preserves the voices and ideas of these two renowned scholars for present and future generations.

Nga PepehaNga Pepeha a nga Tipuna: The Sayings of the Ancestors by Hirini Moko Mead and Neil Grove

RRP $50

This collection contains over 2500 'pepeha', or 'sayings of the ancestors', that were gathered and compiled from all over New Zealand over a 20-year period. More than just proverbs, 'pepeha' include charms, witticisms, figures of speech, and boasts, and they are featured in the formal speeches heard every day on the 'marae' and in the oral literature handed down from past generations. These expressions provide a rich source of vocabulary, using metaphor and an economy of words to show language that enriches the Maori of today.

CCollaborative and Indigenous Mental Health Therapyollaborative and Indigenous Mental Health Therapy by Wiremu NiaNia, Allister Bush and David Epston

RRP $45

This book examines a collaboration between traditional Maori healing and clinical psychiatry. Comprised of transcribed interviews and detailed meditations on practice, it demonstrates how bicultural partnership frameworks can augment mental health treatment by balancing local imperatives with sound and careful psychiatric care. In the first chapter, Maori healer Wiremu NiaNia outlines the key concepts that underpin his worldview and work. He then discusses the social, historical, and cultural context of his relationship with Allister Bush, a child and adolescent psychiatrist. The main body of the book comprises chapters that each recount the story of one young person and their family's experience of Maori healing from three or more points of view: those of the psychiatrist, the Maori healer and the young person and other family members who participated in and experienced the healing. With a foreword by Sir Mason Durie, this book is essential reading for psychologists, social workers, nurses, therapists, psychiatrists, and students interested in bicultural studies.

WhaikareroWhaikarero: The World of Maori Oratory by Poia Rewi

RRP $45

Anyone who has been welcomed on to a marae in New Zealand, will understand that whaikorero - oratory - is at the heart of Maori culture. Whaikorero: The World of Maori Oratory is the first introduction to this fundamental Maori art to be widely published. It is based on broad research as well as oral histories from 30 of the leading exponents of whaikorero, many of whom have subsequently died. Author Poia Rewi's informants are affiliated to many iwi including Tuhoe, Ngati Kahungunu, Te Arawa, Ngati Porou, Ngati Awa, Waikato-Maniapoto, Te Whakatohea, Nga Puhi, and Ngati Whare. In Whaikorero, Poia Rewi assesses the origin and history of whaikorero; its structure, language and style of delivery; who may speak; and where speech happens. Featuring a range of samples, this handy guide provides high quality exemplars for learners and intermediate speakers of te reo Maori wishing to improve their whaikorero skills. It will be a major book for everyone interested in Maori and Polynesian cultures.

 Te Rongoa Maori Medicine Te Rongoa Maori Medicine by P. M. E. Williams

RRP $30

Pip Williams, a retired pharmacist living in Northland, has spent his life observing and recording the use by local Maori of native plants for medicinal purposes. Te Rongoa Maori brings together his observations on 43 New Zealand plants and the health problems they were used to treat, colourfully interspersed with anecdotal evidence and beautifully illustrated with watercolours and engravings. Much of the information in Te Rongoa Maori was told to the author by Ngapuhi kuia and kaumatua over 40 years ago. Maori in earlier times knew abou the therapeutic benefits derived from trees and plants for a variety of health problems, but had no knowledge of pharmacology. Consequently, Te Rongoa Maori makes no claims to being a manual of Maori medicine. However, it comprises an important and faithful record of information gleaned over a lifetime's close association with the Ngapuhi people, and of the cultureal importance of this heritage.

Maori Healing RemediesMaori Healing Remedies: Rongoa Maori by Murdoch Riley

RRP $32

A useful book of time-tested Maori herbal therapies. By quoting the words of many skilled practitioners of the art of herbal medicine, and by describing some of the spiritual practices and karakia associated, the book becomes a useful compendium of proven therapies, whether for arthritis, headaches, insect bites, rheumatism, skin complaints, sore throats, sprains, wounds etc. Headings for over 30 ailments. The book has beautiful photography by Phil Bendle that identifies many of the indigenous plants used by the Maori.

Maori Healing and HerbalMaori Healing and Herbal by Murdoch Riley

RRP $110

First section of this book surveys Maori health and healing from the pre-contact period with Europeans to the present time. It itemises individual ailments and subjects, discussing the spiritual and herbal healing needed. The second section contains information on some 200 plants with colour photographs of each. This book details New Zealand and world medicinal information according to the particular botanical family. Award winning book with wide appeal, also a recommended textbook for students.

Mauri OraMauri Ora: Wisdom From The Maori World by Peter Aslop and Te Raumawhitu Kupenga

RRP $40

Pearls of wisdom contained in proverbs - whakatauk I - have been gifted from generation to generation as an intrinsic part of the Maori world. As powerful metaphors, they combine analogy and cultural history in the most economical of words. Short and insightful, they surprise, engendering reflection, learning and personal growth. Mauri Ora links whakatauk I to key personal virtues idealised across cultures and generations. The virtues - wisdom, courage, compassion, integrity, self-mastery and belief - stem from the science of positive psychology; the study of how to live a better life. Illustrated throughout with wonderful photographs from an old world, this book draws on traditional wisdom to provide a recipe for personal effectiveness and leadership, and a rewarding connection of Maori knowledge to contemporary thinking about personal happiness and fulfilment.

MaraeMarae - Te Tatau Pounamu: A Journey Around New Zealand's Meeting Houses by Muru Walters, Robin Walters & Sam Walters.  RRP $80

 Bishop Muru Walters is a very well known Anglican minister. He is also a master carver, poet, broadcaster and former Maori All Black. His son Robin is a photographer and filmmaker who is director at Curious Films. Sam Walters, Robin's wife, is a photographer. Together the Walters spent three years visiting some of this country's major meeting houses as well as many of the more humble ones - houses that serve smaller hapu and iwi - to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house. They are intensively photographed, with detailed shots of their carvings, kowhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event, the images conveying a rich sense of life and activity. From north to south, from the east coast to the west, and from ancient wharenui to bold new designs, this handsome book, with its engaging personal text, captures the huge variety of New Zealand's original architecture. It's a book for all New Zealanders to treasure.

Biography

Nga Morehu The Survivors Nga Morehu: The Survivors by Judith Binney and Gillian Chaplin

RRP $50

For much of women's history, memory is the only way of discovering the past. Other sources simply do not exist. This is true for any history of Maori women in this century. All the women in this book have lived through times of acute social disturbance. Their voices must be heard. Judith Binney, 1992. In eight remarkable oral histories, Nga Morehu brings alive the experience of Maori women from the mid-twentieth century. Heni Brown, Reremoana Koopu, Maaka Jones, Hei Ariki Algie, Heni Sunderland, Miria Rua, Putiputi Onekawa and Te Akakura Rua talked with Judith Binney and Gillian Chaplin, sharing stories and memoires. These are the women whose 'voices must be heard'. The title, 'The survivors', refects the women's connection with the visionary leader Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki and his followers, who adopted the name 'Nga Morehu' during the wars of the 1860s. But these women are not only survivors: they are also the chosen ones, the leaders of their society. They speak here of richly diverse lives - of arranged marriages and whangai adoption traditions, of working in both Maori and Pakeha communities. They pay testimony to their strong sense of a shared identity created by religious and community teachings.

Tuai A Traveller in Two WorldsTuai: A Traveller in Two Worlds by Alison Jones and Kuni Kaa Jenkins

RRP $45

In early 1817 Tuai, a young Ngare Raumati chief from the Bay of Islands, set off for England. He was one of a number of M?ori who, after encountering European explorers, traders and missionaries in New Zealand, seized opportunities to travel beyond their familiar shores to Australia, England and Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They sought new knowledge, useful goods and technologies, and a mutually beneficial relationship with the people they knew as P?keh?.On his epic journey Tuai would visit exotic foreign ports, mix with teeming crowds in the huge metropolis of London, and witness the marvels of industrialisation at the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire. With his lively travelling companion T?tere, he would attend fashionable gatherings and sit for his portrait. He shared his deep understanding of M?ori language and culture. And his missionary friends did their best to convert him to Christianity. But on returning to his M?ori world in 1819, Tuai found there were difficult choices to be made. His plan to integrate new European knowledge and relationships into his Ngare Raumati community was to be challenged by the rapidly shifting politics of the Bay of Islands.With sympathy and insight, Alison Jones and Kuni Kaa Jenkins uncover the remarkable story of one of the first Maori travellers to Europe.

Arts & Craft

Te Toi Whakairo - The Art of Maori CarvingTe Toi Whakairo - The Art of Moari Carving  2015 edition Hirini Moko Mead RRP$45

Wood carving is one of the supreme expressions of New Zealand identity. Beginning with carving's mythical origins, Te Toi Whakairo explores the evolution of styles and techniques through the four main artistic periods to the present day, and provides detailed explanations of carving styles in different parts of the country, using examples from meeting houses and leading artists.Later chapters delve into the the main structures, forms and motifs, and the role of the woodcarver, and explore the status of the art in contemporary New Zealand. Practical guidance is given for use of materials, tools, techniques, surface and background decoration, the human figure, and carving poupou.

Ko RongowhakaataKo Rongowhakaata: Ruku I Te Po, Ruku I Te Ao | The Story of Light and Shadow

RRP $40

This book is published to mark the opening of the Ko Rongowhakaata: The Story of Light and Shadow exhibition at Te Papa, which represents the culmination and breadth of Rongowhakaata history and whakaaro (considerations) and has the significant meeting house Te Hau ki Turanga as its central statement of identity and aspiration. The book showcases more than 60 Rongowhakaata taonga, and its text, in English and te reo Maori, focuses on key threads including innovation and kaitiekitanga (sustainable processes). It also explores layers of encounter within Turanga - Rongowhakaata and Gisborne iwi first encountered the British in 1769, during Captain Cook's arrival in Poverty Bay - and the impacts of those encounters on the shape and position of the iwi, and indeed modern New Zealand, today.

Te Mahi KeteTe Mahi Kete: Maori Flaxwork For Beginners by Mick Pendergrast

RRP $35

Anyone can learn to make a plaited kete, one of the oldest and most popular of Maori art forms, from the leaves of New Zealand flax (phormium tenax). Te Mahi Kete gives detailed, step-by-step instructions, illustrated with numerous line drawings and black-and-white photographs, for preparing the flax and plaiting two simple types of kete. It also shows variations in technique for starting and finishing, making the handles and incorporating a decorative pattern.

Fun with FlaxFun With Flax: 50 Projects For Beginners by Mick Pendergrast

RRP $32

These 50 interesting and entertaining projects are designed to teach beginners the basic skills of the Maori craft of plaiting. Fun with Flax shows how to make items ranging from a simple windmill, a dart and a whistle to more complex puzzles, balls, birds, fish and even a caterpillar. Each project is described one step at a time with easy-to-follow line drawings and instructions. All are fun and will delight children and adults with their ingenuity, their beauty and the amusement they provide. This book is ideal for kohanga reo, playcentres, kindergartens, Maori crafts groups and New Zealand homes. It aims not only to teach the skills of plaiting to young New Zealanders but also to nurture a new generation of flaxworkers.

Bone CarvingBone Carving: A Skillbase of Techniques and Concepts by Stephen Myhre

RRP $35

A Whakapapa of Tradition: One Hundred Years of Ngati Porou Carving, 1830-1930A Whakapapa of Tradition: One Hundred Years of Ngati Porou Carving, 1830-1930 by Ngarino Ellis  RRP $90

 Maori carving went through a rapid evolution from 1830 to 1930. Beginning around 1830, three dominant art traditions - war canoes, decorated storehouses and chiefly houses - declined and were replaced by whare karakia (churches), whare whakairo (decorated meeting houses) and wharekai (dining halls). In A Whakapapa of Tradition, Ngarino Ellis examines how and why that fundamental transformation took place by exploring the Iwirakau school of carving - an ancestor who lived in the Waiapu Valley around 1700, Iwirakau is credited with reinvigorating carving on the East Coast. The six major carvers of his school went on to create more than thirty important meeting houses and other structures, which Ellis explores to tell this story of Ngati Porou carving and a profound transformation in Maori art. A Whakapapa of Tradition also attempts to make sense of Maori art history, exploring what makes a tradition in Maori art; how traditions begin and, conversely, how and why they cease. Beautifully illustrated with new photography by Natalie Robertson, and drawing on the work of key scholars to make a new synthetic whole, A Whakapapa of Tradition will be a landmark volume in the history of writing about Maori art.

Gottfried Lindauer's New ZealandGottfried Lindauer's New Zealand Edited by Ngahiraka Mason and Zara Stanhope

RRP $75

From the 1870s to the early twentieth century, the Bohemian immigrant artist Gottfried Lindauer travelled to marae and rural towns around New Zealand and - commissioned by Maori and Pakeha - captured in paint the images of key Maori figures. For Maori then and now, the faces of tipuna are full of mana and life. Now this definitive work collects those portraits for New Zealanders. The book presents 67 major portraits and 8 genre paintings alongside detailed accounts of the subject and work, with essays by leading scholars that take us inside Lindauer and his world: from his artistic training in Bohemia to his travels around New Zealand as Maori and Pakeha commissioned him to paint portraits; his artistic techniques and deep relationship with photography; Henry Partridge's gallery on Auckland's Queen Street where Maori visited to see their ancestors; and the afterlife of the paintings in marae and memory.